Writing Journal 71: Reading On The Go

Writing Journal 71: Reading On The Go

My writing journal for Wednesday, October 22, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

More meetings today; with luck, they’ll be the final ones for this week. Everyone’s just realized that the holiday sales season is upon us. No complaints… I love being busy, so this is an exciting time of the year for me, and for you too, I hope. Things won’t settle down on the marketing front until after Valentine’s Day.

As usual, my writing day starts with work on the mystery novel. I didn’t get much written this morning; just 600 words. I was planning out several scenes. It’s still going well. :-)

Then, the two nonfiction books. I’m focusing on the print book at the moment. I create some notes for the graphic designer, so that he can develop a couple of charts. Words: 1,800.

Honey’s lazy this morning, but gobbles her breakfast, and then settles down on her bed. I eat my breakfast while checking over the morning’s email messages, and respond to several. Email’s building up a backlog again. I schedule “email time” in my bullet journal, and prepare for the two meetings.

A couple of writers asked about how to get more reading done. I suggested reading on the go; it’s how I manage it. There are always minutes during the day that you could be spending reading. If you prepare for those minutes, you can read much more, without affecting your family time, or your schedule.

Reading on go: keep up with yourself, and everyone else

I wrote about social media writing on my freelance blog.

Mostly, I read on my iPad. I use Flipboard, and if I find something I want to post to social media, I can do it right away. Alternatively, I can save an item to Pocket, and read it and share it later.

If I’m having lunch at my computer (yep, bad habit), I read social media on my iPad. It’s relaxing. Later, in Pocket on my Mac, I can tag items, send them to any social media network I choose, or I can send articles to Evernote. Of course, I can just delete an article too.

To read my own and clients’ material for editing, I use Send to Kindle. I just downloaded a PDF from a marketing company on repurposing content, for example. At a glance, I can see that the PDF contains some great ideas. I drag it into the Send to Kindle icon on my Dock. (I’m a Mac user.) I can read the PDF on my phone, or on my tablet.

Send to Kindle is excellent, obviously, for long material. My first step in editing a book is always to read it in the Kindle app. I can read on my phone anywhere — while waiting for a meetings to start, while in the queue at the bank… Try it. You’ll find that reading in the Kindle app gives you a fresh perspective on material.

Back again…

After two days of running around, I’m way behind on everything, even though I scheduled as well as I could. I spend an hour typing up notes from the meetings, and scheduling new projects and tasks. Most are short, thank heavens.

With that done, it’s time to deal with email again, and then, phone calls.

The day isn’t over yet; I’ve got a rush copywriting job to do for a client tonight. I do my daily review, and I’m ready to relax for a few hours.

The Easy-Write Process has been updated for 2015

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, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Send to Kindle: Read Your Stuff on Your Kindle (or Kindle App)

Send to Kindle
Send to Kindle

I’m a huge Kindle fan; I spend much of my day in the Kindle app on my iPad. Either I’m reading my own material, or I’m reading something for a client, or I’m reading for entertainment.

A couple of my writing students weren’t aware that you can use your Kindle for your own documents, so here’s an explanation of how it works.

By the way — sending your own docs is free, as long as you use wifi. If you’re using Amazon’s WhisperNet services, charges apply. 

Read your stuff on your Kindle, or in a Kindle app

Important: you don’t need to own a Kindle device. You can use the Kindle app on your computer, phone or tablet – no device necessary. I own a couple of Kindle devices, but rarely use them; the apps are handier, especially when traveling. You’ve always got your phone in your pocket or bag: the Kindle app’s very readable, even on your phone.

The ability to read your own stuff on the Kindle is very useful. “Your own stuff” may be PDFs, MS Word docs, or other popular file types. Visit Amazon’s Send to Kindle page for info.

Blogging? If you’re a WordPress blogger, you can install the Send to Kindle plugin so that your visitors can read blog posts later.

I’ve got the Send to Kindle app on my computer, so I drag files across to the app’s icon upload them. The next time I open the Kindle app on my iPad, the files are there, under Docs.

You can also send files via email. Just send them to your Kindle email address. (Add the address to your contacts list.)

Wondering how you can use the Send to Kindle facility?

1. Review long documents you’re creating: “publish” them to the Kindle

When you’re creating long documents (books, reports) send them to the Kindle to review them while you’re away from your computer. I often drag documents across to the Send to Kindle app so that I can do a final read-through before I send an ebook to a client.

2. Create yet another backup

If you’re truly paranoid about losing hours of work, send important documents to your Kindle address to create another backup.

3. Catch up on your reading

Brett Kelly’s just come out with version 4 of the excellent Evernote Essentials book. (It’s a free update if you own version 3.) I dragged it straight to Send to Kindle; I’ll read it over the weekend, while relaxing.

4. Create a reference library

Every business has business reference material, everything from legal documents to price lists. You can keep these references in your Kindle library, so that you can access them anywhere.

Send to Kindle’s an excellent utility. Give it a try.
, and on Twitter: @angee

Tablet Computers: How Do You Use Your Tablet?

Ipad

CNET’s running a poll, How do you use your tablet?. We’ve fallen in love with our tablets:

“Fast-forward three years. Now we all know exactly what tablets are good for and what they’re not. We buy different sizes to accommodate different needs and purposes. Heck, some of us are already moving on to our second or even third tablet.”

I mainly use my iPad for reading. I read for hours on my iPad every day, and although I wouldn’t have thought such a thing possible, I prefer it to print. Reading a real book’s uncomfortable for me now. I need to hunt around for paper to make notes, and if I want to look something up I need to reach for the tablet anyway.

Currently I’m on a Georgette Heyer kick, so on the weekend, I reread The Talisman Ring for the first time in years. In that book, there are snippets of French. My high school French wasn’t up to the task of translating
ventre à terre, so I looked it up.

That’s the benefit of reading on a tablet; you get instant results when you need to know something now.

iPad for writers

The biggest benefit for me as a writer however, is that I don’t need to carry a lot of stuff with me to client meetings.

My portfolio lives on my iPad. I can instantly give a presentation. I can hand clients an electronic brochure at the end of the meeting, along with any material which might be useful to them.

Of course, I can write and research anywhere. I take the iPad to the library, to work on books. I take it to a coffee shop to brainstorm blog posts and client projects.

When I bought my first iPad, I wasn’t sure how I’d use it. Over time, I spend more time with my iPad than I do with my production machine.

So, go take the CNET poll. Tell the good people there how you use your tablet computer. I’ll bet you use it more than you thought you would, before it entered your life.