5 Keyword Tips To Inspire You: Never Run out of Content Ideas Again

keyword content ideas

Curses! Google’s turned off the free keyword tool, which means you need to log in to AdWords and use the Keyword Planner if you want Google’s data. But what if you want to use keywords to inspire your content creation, rather than to buy ads?

A little digression. Please be aware that since Hummingbird flew out of its cage, it’s vital to consider your audience, and its needs, rather than create content to any keyword formula. So these days, Google’s free keyword tool would be much less useful anyway. (We all feel better now, right?)

Let’s look at five keyword tips which ensure that you will NEVER run out of content ideas again.

1. Consider user intent, and focus on “themes”

I love this insight from Aaron Wahlstrom. He discusses how to find content ideas without using Google’s free keyword tool, and in the age of Hummingbird:

This is why keyword “themes” and specific theme landing pages will become more important. For instance, if a user historically was using the queries “A great SEO company for a B2B industrial company” versus “B2B SEO”, you may have received vastly different results. However with Hummingbird, the intent behind this search is largely the same. In this case, it is important to now have a page which targets a theme of Industrial B2B SEO, with good content, which will capture both of these queries.

Here’s how this could work for you in practice. Let’s say that you own a garden center, and you’ve been targeting specific keywords for fertilizers in your content. You’ve been writing about fertilizer brands, when and where to use fertilizer etc.

Corral all the “fertilizer” content you have, to see what you’ve got. Next, create an “everything you always wanted to know about fertilizer but didn’t know who to ask” page. Interview your own fertilizer expert, and the rest of your staff too. You want your new page to be as comprehensive as you can make it. Link out to the fertilizer content you already have.

As Aaron suggests in his article, this is your “theme landing page.”

As you corral the content you have, and create your page, 1001 new content ideas will emerge.

2. What’s in the news? Create alerts for your favorite keywords

Go to Google News, and enter your favorite keywords, one by one. Create alerts for them all.

I just entered “fertilizer” into Google News, and got the result you can see in the image below.

keyword in Google News

Depending on your keywords, you may get a lot of results, or very few. Either way, you’ll get some inspiration for content ideas.

3. Use Google Suggest: go through the alphabet

This is my favorite easy, keyword content idea inspiration-getter. All you do is go to Google.com, and enter your keyword, plus a letter of the alphabet.

In the image below, I entered “fertilizer”, and the letter “a.”

Google Suggest
Google Suggest

Just meander through the alphabet, and see what ideas you get. You’re sure to find several ideas which inspire content.

4. Hello Amazon: enter your keyword, and browse books on your topic

Depending on your keywords, you can get some great inspiration here, especially for your “theme” landing pages.

Just enter your keyword into Amazon Book Search, as in the image below. Then check out the Tables of Contents of any books which appeal to you, using Look Inside/ Table of Contents.

Amazon for content ideas

5. Use Soovle, for inspiration-at-a-glance content ideas

Wedded to Google? Google isn’t the only search engine. There are lots more, but don’t worry, you don’t have to click your way through them all. Let Soovle do it for you.

Soovle

As you can see in the image above, Soovle pulls from several search engines, including Wikipedia, Amazon, and YouTube, to give you lots of content ideas.

So there you have it. Five ways to get ideas for content, using keywords, and without using Google’s free keyword tool.

Need content? Contact me today.

, and on Twitter: @angee

Google and SEO: “Social Signals are For the Long Haul”

“There is no longer any value in serving up generic or commodity information. With Hummingbird and semantic search, Google is getting better at using machine learning to understand the world’s knowledge base. The main reason for Google Search to exist, from Google’s point of view, is for people to be exposed to AdWords ads, the source of most of Google’s income.”

From Matt Cutts at Pubcon 2013: Authorship, Authority and the Future of Search.

Google’s New Hummingbird Search Algorithm: 3 Things to Do Now

Google's New Hummingbird Search Algorithm

Google’s 15 years old, and like any teenager, it’s changing fast, and turning into an adult. A VERY smart (and somewhat scary) adult.

If you were online when Google was born (aka “the good old days”), you considered that search engines were indexing machines and relaxed. You simply went to town on keywords, and called it done. Your websites ranked, your content was found, and all was well with the world.

Happy days. Things were much simpler then.

What’s a Hummingbird?

A hummingbird is an itty bitty nectar-drinking bird with a super-fast metabolism.

So, why did Google call the new algorithm “Hummingbird”?

Google told us the name come from being “precise and fast.”

With Hummingbird, Google brings together personalization (Google knows who you are and where you live), semantic search, and mobile search.

Tip: if your website’s not optimized for mobile devices, do that now.

Google’s building on its strengths

Google’s always been focused on delivering fast and relevant results. Now it’s going a step further. It wants to become your personal assistant:

Personal Assistant Vs. Information Retrieval

You can clearly see where search is acting less and less as information retrieval and more as a personal assistant. Apple’s SIRI leverages semantics as well, initially using it to enable interoperability and the scheduling of services when a natural-language query is initiated. Google Now has similar functionality.

Three things to do now

Lots to love, right? But how will Hummingbird affect your search engine traffic? No one knows, because Hummingbird isn’t just an algorithm update, it’s a completely new algorithm.

The good news is that Hummingbird was live for a month before Google announced it, so if you didn’t see a massive change in traffic, you probably won’t.

Let’s look at three things you can do to thrive with Hummingbird.

1. Give your audience what it wants: focus on intention

Mark Fagan, of iProspect, said:

(Hummingbird) may represent a step change in the way that SEO practitioners optimize content, since there will be less focus on the exact phrases used and more on the underlying meaning. It’s all about trying to deliver better search results for consumers, which is a good thing.

It’s vital to understand your target audience, and the intentions behind their search queries. Cut loose from keyword-focused content creation, and think of your audience’s interests and needs.

Check Google’s content guidelines too.

2. Say hello to Google+: it’s all about people and trust

Does Google trust you? Google wants to know you, and the people who know you, and the people you know, so start using Google+ if you aren’t already doing so.

Here’s an excellent article on why you should be doing that:

The addition of real people to the Google search algorithm and the ability of the algorithm to learn what people really like, and want, will result in the best companies, products and services rising to the top in both search rankings and business. Competitors with poor products and services will fade way regardless of size. This is not something that can be fixed by throwing money at it.

3. Run a great business, and create great content

Chris Kilbourn wrote about SEO in the age of Hummingbird:

So what does all this add up to?

If you don’t want to spend your time following Matt Cutts around like a lost puppy, then here’s what it boils down to: DO create great content for real people and DON’T try to trick them. OK?

Hummingbird frees you

In summary, if Hummingbird works as it should, you don’t need to worry about anything other than running a great business, and promoting it well, both online and offline.

, and on Twitter: @angee

 

photo credit: Gonzak via photopin cc