Writing Journal 73: Free Content Library Available Now

Writing Journal 73: Free Content Library Available Now

My writing journal for Friday, October 24, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

The mystery novel went well, as usual, with 2,200 words. Then on to the two nonfiction books, with 1,800 words.

Honey’s breakfast, and my own, while catching up with email. It’s predicted to be warm today, with showers later, so I left for my walk.

As soon as I got back, I caught up with client phone calls and messages. Friday’s my day to update clients on their projects’ progress.

Next, I analyzed traffic, and brainstormed content for clients’ websites and blogs. This afternoon, I’ll need to fit in some more blog content research.

Julia and I left for an early lunch, just in case someone called and we got caught up again. We’ve missed our Friday lunches. Hummingbird cake for dessert, of course. :-)

Back again to work on the copywriting projects I developed concepts for, and brainstormed, yesterday. The drafting went quickly. I’ve learned never to worry about projects at the draft stage. It’s essential to get something written, no matter how useless the writing appears. Then you can work with what you have.

Writers tend to struggle with getting stuff down. The solution is to write something. Once you have something, you can revise it, or trash it completely. Even if you trash it, you’ll find that the effort you put in isn’t wasted. You may well come up with a brilliant idea, sparked by your rubbishy drafts.

Angela Booth's EASY-WRITE Process 4 for 2015

If you want more information on how all this works, I cover it in great detail — with exercises — in the Easy-Write Process.

I developed the strategies in the Easy-Write Process over many years, and of course, I use them myself.

Writers love the Easy-Write Process, because it helps you to write, rather than worry, and it eliminates procrastination completely.

 

 

 

 

Writing Genii launches, with the Free Content Library

Writing Genii

Writing Genii has finally launched. I hope you enjoy the Free Content Library. I wrote about the site relaunch on my freelance writing blog. I said:

Today, 30 MILLION pieces of content flow onto the Web, each and every day. That’s a LOT of content. You, I, and every other writer has to compete with that for attention. As we said in Professional Writing Going Forward to 2015, professional writing is changing. If you want to make a great income from your writing, you need to become much more entrepreneurial.

The Free Content Library helps new writers to get up to speed on the world of writing as it is in 2014, and in 2015 and beyond. Eventually, we’ll have many ebooks in the library for you to download, and put to use. You can download the first two ebooks now. My hope is that they’ll arm you to develop a real writing business.

Basically, Writing Genii is for anyone who wants to turn their creativity into a business.

Onward…

With the copywriting material drafted, I drafted some blog posts for clients’ blogs. I’ll complete the posts, and scheduled them for publication next week. I always like to have a collection of draft posts ready to go, otherwise you can fall behind on your blogging very easily.

And that’s it for the day. My daily review is done, and so’s the writing week.

Check out Writing Genii

Check out Writing Genii; we’ll be publishing more content to our Free Content Library. Enjoy the resource. :-)

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Content Creation Business Model: Free Content and Paid Content

“Content is king.” How many times have you heard that? It’s true, as far as it goes. I prefer: content is king, but only if you can figure out how to make money from it.

Web content

Here’s a thought-provoking article for any business engaged in content creation, Search Engines Don’t Encourage Valuable Content Creation:

“Bottom line: if your business model involves creating valuable content, you’re going to need a strategy to protect it and claw value back from aggregators and networks in order for a content model to be sustainable.”

That’s the challenge for any business with a content creation business model, to give some of your content away for “free”, but keep the best material locked away for your loyal readers who are willing to pay for it.

Making money directly from content is a tough business. On my freelance writing blog, I’ve been talking about the writers’ “work for free” controversy. An editor from The Atlantic site told journalist Nathan Thayer that “we do reach 13 million readers a month”.

That’s a lot of readers, but The Atlantic still only pays $100 an article, and prefers to pay nothing at all. Obviously their business model is sustainable for them.

The challenge: free and paid content? Or paid content only?

Content costs. It’s not free. It takes time and money to create. If you have a content creation business model, make sure the model works for you. Work out how much your “free” content is costing you. If you’re not getting benefits from it, it might be time to lock up your content. Publish your best content as ebooks, on Amazon, rather than giving it away.

photo credit: striatic via photopin cc