Send to Kindle: Read Your Stuff on Your Kindle (or Kindle App)

Send to Kindle
Send to Kindle

I’m a huge Kindle fan; I spend much of my day in the Kindle app on my iPad. Either I’m reading my own material, or I’m reading something for a client, or I’m reading for entertainment.

A couple of my writing students weren’t aware that you can use your Kindle for your own documents, so here’s an explanation of how it works.

By the way — sending your own docs is free, as long as you use wifi. If you’re using Amazon’s WhisperNet services, charges apply. 

Read your stuff on your Kindle, or in a Kindle app

Important: you don’t need to own a Kindle device. You can use the Kindle app on your computer, phone or tablet – no device necessary. I own a couple of Kindle devices, but rarely use them; the apps are handier, especially when traveling. You’ve always got your phone in your pocket or bag: the Kindle app’s very readable, even on your phone.

The ability to read your own stuff on the Kindle is very useful. “Your own stuff” may be PDFs, MS Word docs, or other popular file types. Visit Amazon’s Send to Kindle page for info.

Blogging? If you’re a WordPress blogger, you can install the Send to Kindle plugin so that your visitors can read blog posts later.

I’ve got the Send to Kindle app on my computer, so I drag files across to the app’s icon upload them. The next time I open the Kindle app on my iPad, the files are there, under Docs.

You can also send files via email. Just send them to your Kindle email address. (Add the address to your contacts list.)

Wondering how you can use the Send to Kindle facility?

1. Review long documents you’re creating: “publish” them to the Kindle

When you’re creating long documents (books, reports) send them to the Kindle to review them while you’re away from your computer. I often drag documents across to the Send to Kindle app so that I can do a final read-through before I send an ebook to a client.

2. Create yet another backup

If you’re truly paranoid about losing hours of work, send important documents to your Kindle address to create another backup.

3. Catch up on your reading

Brett Kelly’s just come out with version 4 of the excellent Evernote Essentials book. (It’s a free update if you own version 3.) I dragged it straight to Send to Kindle; I’ll read it over the weekend, while relaxing.

4. Create a reference library

Every business has business reference material, everything from legal documents to price lists. You can keep these references in your Kindle library, so that you can access them anywhere.

Send to Kindle’s an excellent utility. Give it a try.
, and on Twitter: @angee

The End for Posterous: Download Your Blogs Now

Posterous Backup

If you’ve got a Posterous blog, or blogs, you need to grab them now; Posterous is closing down on April 30.

Full instructions are on the page; they’re easy. You just click the Backup bottom, and you receive a link to your zipped blog archive.

If you want to move your posts to WordPress, here’s how.

I haven’t received my Zip file yet; I doubt I’ll be moving the entire blog to one of my WordPress sites, but I will be retrieving useful material.

So — go on, grab your zip now, before your blog(s) vanish forever. :-)