Writing a Book for Your Business: Hooks

A reader asked me about writing a book, and getting it published. Her goal is to promote her coaching business; she hopes that her book will give her visibility. It can certainly do that, but if you’re writing a book for your business, you need to ensure that your goals match those of your publisher.

Your goal: to promote your business.

Your publisher’s goal: to sell lots of books.

The bigger the publisher, the more books the company aims to sell. This means that you’ll need a good hook to gain a publisher’s interest. Celebrity books sell (some of them) because they have a built-in hook: the celebrity’s name. The publisher hopes that the celebrity’s fans will buy the book.

The Independent reports in Zoella: Zoe Sugg’s book Girl Online becomes fastest-selling debut novel ever:

The 24-year-old has become an online sensation after creating video blogs with beauty advice, helping her gain more than 9 million subscribers to her two YouTube channels since 2009.

For the publisher, the hook was… 9 million subscribers. They gambled that some of Zoella’s subscribers would buy the book, and the gamble paid off.

You need a hook: find it, before you start writing

What’s a “hook”? Something which gets attention. Check out Amazon’s top nonfiction books of the month. They’ve all got hooks; it’s in the title. Currently, a book called “Being Mortal: Illness, Medicine and What Matters in the End” is this month’s top seller. That’s not surprising, because we’re all either worried about our own health, or the health of someone close.

Consider this book, “The Boy Who Came Back From Heaven”: a brilliant hook, right? And so it was. The hook sold the book, until it was exposed as a fake.

When I’m ghostwriting nonfiction, my first step is always to find the hook. It should be your first step too, if you’re writing a book to promote your business, and want to find a publisher. Good luck — it’s an essential first step, and it’s well worth bending your brain to find it. :-)

Serial Fiction Bonanza: Get Readers, Get Fans — Make A Solid Income From Your Fiction FAST

Serial Fiction Bonanza: Get Readers, Get Fans — Make A Solid Income From Your Fiction FAST

Serial fiction has been around since the days of Charles Dickens. Self-publishing authors love it. Discover how to write serials in our new four week class. Coaching is included — you’re not writing alone.

By the end of the program, you’ll have published several episodes of your serial fiction. You’ll also be steadily marketing, while you’re writing and publishing.

Join us: you’ll have a lot of fun, and you’ll boost your fiction writing career.

, on Twitter: @angee, and find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Earn while you learn, with Angela’s Writing Classes..

5 Ways a Ghostwriter Can Help You and Your Business

Ghostwriter
The secret life of a ghostwriter…

Celebrities and business personalities use ghostwriters, and you can too. A ghostwriter can help you in many different ways.

I seem to fall into things by accident – my copywriting career, and my ghostwriting career too. In the 1990s I wrote business books for the publisher Prentice Hall, and my editor asked me to take on some ghostwriting projects. I’ve been happily ghosting ever since; most recently, ghostwriting fiction.

Let’s look at five ways a ghostwriter can help you and your business.

1. You can get more done

If you hate writing, a ghostwriter can take over many chores for you – we create presentations, speeches, scripts, magazine articles, and more.

Your ghostwriter will write as you: you own the words. You’ll chat with your ghostwriter before and during the project.

Hiring a ghostwriter frees up time.

2. You can do things you’ve always wanted to do (painlessly)

Do you want to write a book? I read somewhere that ten per cent of the population wants to write a book. Books take time. If you’ve wanted to write a book for the past decade, and never got around to completing it, chat to a ghost, and get into print.

3. You can enhance your brand and image

Many of the ghostwriting projects I take on involve creating branding material: executive and company brand statements and bios.

A bio represents you. It’s a good idea to create at least a couple of them, so that you can emphasize different aspects for different purposes.

As I say on this page: In these tough economic times, a resume just isn’t enough… you need more.

A bio helps you to stand out from the crowd.

Management guru Tom Peters wrote The Brand Called You in 1997, and it’s more relevant today than ever, because the competition’s tougher. He said:

Regardless of age, regardless of position, regardless of the business we happen to be in, all of us need to understand the importance of branding. We are CEOs of our own companies: Me Inc. To be in business today, our most important job is to be head marketer for the brand called You.

It’s that simple – and that hard. And that inescapable.

4. You can increase your income

Academics may need to publish to survive. Business people publish to thrive.

How would your standing and income increase if:

  • You were published in trade journals?
  • You became a thought leader by publishing articles and a blog?
  • You published a book?

5. You get bragging rights

Hate to brag? You don’t need to. Let your book brag for you. There’s still considerable cachet in being an “author”.

If you want to write – anything, not just a book – your ghostwriter can do it for you. The best part? We’ll never tell that you didn’t write it yourself. :-)

When people ask me what I do, and I mention ghostwriting, they ask questions. If you’ve got questions about ghostwriting, and how a ghostwriter could help you, feel free to ask.

 

, and on Twitter: @angee