Tag Archives: social media

Your Google+ Business Page: Create An Asset

Your Google+ Business Page: Create An Asset

Got a Google+ business page? Me too. However, a Google+ business page has been a hard sell to my clients: “I’ve got a Facebook page, why do I need a Google+ page too?” 

The short answer: Google. Google’s been promoting Google My Business:

Google My Business connects you directly with customers, whether they’re looking for you on Search, Maps or Google+.

Here’s the FAQ to Google My Business. Basically, Google’s tying everything together — search, maps, and social media via Google+, and it all starts when you set up your Google+  business page and verify your address. (Google will send you a postcard.)

Look on your Google+ business page as an asset: one you need to promote your business effectively.

 What about SEO?

Search engine optimization (SEO) will always be important. The “search engines” are just software scripts. Your website and blog pages need meta data to tell the scripts what each page is about. Your pages still need to be “optimized”, in a sense. And you still need links to your pages. Nothing has changed; Web content is what it always was.

However, social media is becoming ever more important, and search engines are getting smarter. Google wants to tie all your business information together  to help your customers to find you, and to do a better job of indexing the Web.

So, a Google+ business page as gone from “meh, who needs it? I’ve got Facebook”, to becoming the foundation of your online marketing. Don’t fight it. Click the big blue “Get on Google” button on the top right of Google My Business, and get started. :-) As Google is at pains to point out, it’s free, so it won’t cost you anything.

You’ve got a Google+ business page, now what?

Start posting to your page, and getting followers to your page. Social Media Examiner gives you 11 ways to get followers to your Google+ business page:

One of the first tips I give people is to use your Google+ personal profile to interact with your Google+ business page content.

Since Google’s using your information for Web search, it’s vital that you show willing, and get some content on your Google+ business page, and some engagement going too.

Google advises:

Keep your customers in the know by posting updates, news and special offers on your Google+ page. Your customers can +1 and comment on the content you post, giving you a direct connection to their feedback.

Treat your page as you’d treat your other social media pages. Promote your page on your website, and ask customers to respond. As Google suggests, make it worth their while to visit your page and interact by posting special offers for them.

So there you have it. Like it or not, your Google+ business page is important. It’s a vital asset for your business. You need one. Google has spoken. :-)

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Pinterest Traffic: Start Pinning

Pinterest Traffic: Start Pinning

Are you missing out on Pinterest traffic? Chances are that you are.  One of my clients was curious about a sudden flow of traffic from Pinterest, and called me. I’d been encouraging him to try Pinterest for at least a year, but he’d taken a look at the site, and had decided it wasn’t for him.

Then he got traffic from kind people who pinned his products, and he’s now decided that Pinterest should be part of his social media marketing endeavors.

Pinterest Traffic: Get images, and a Pinterest account

Here’s what I love about Pinterest: your pins are long-lasting. Unlike Twitter or Facebook, your pins don’t have a shelf-life which is measured in minutes. You can get traffic from stuff you pinned months ago.

If you’d like to get started with Pinterest, start by looking at the images on your offerings. If you don’t have images, create some.

This doesn’t need to be a major investment. One of my client has a B2B website offering services. He’d never considered images. We developed some templates with placeholder images  with the help of a designer. He can take photos himself, then drag them into the templates, save, and upload them in a couple of minutes.

Once you’ve created some images, get a Pinterest business account. Create a couple of boards for your business. Make one board business-related, and the other fun – Pinterest is a social media network. Some ideas:

Create Pinterest boards with specific questions your website’s visitors have, or around a specific theme. For example, if you have an online business selling accessories, create boards for each kind of accessory, and for your designers too. Check out what major brands are doing. Keep your boards light-hearted.

Give Pinterest a try. You may be surprised at how effective it can be as an additional source of traffic to your website.
, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Social Media Sharing: Your Own, or Others’ Content?

Social Media Sharing: Your Own, or Others' Content?

Social media sharing can be a challenge, especially the ratios of the various kinds of content. Should you blast out your own material, or should you minimize your own input, and focus on sharing others’ content which you hope your audience will find valuable?

A couple of authors asked about social sharing ratios in reference to the article on book marketing in 30 minutes a week.

Kevan Lee of Buffer posted “6 popular ratios for sharing content on social media”, and you can certainly follow others’ formulas. However, it all comes down to your audience, your time, and the social media network.

To be honest, I don’t think about it too much. Of course, I don’t consider myself a social media expert. Apropos of social media experts, B.L. Ochman’s funny post: Twitter bios show epic growth – to 297,897 – of self-proclaimed social media gurus will make you smile. “Social media whores”? Who knew? :-)

As regards sharing, I’m with Buffer. Kevan Lee said:

Our social media updates are 90 percent our own content and 10 percent from others, and many days those numbers are even more lopsided.

Here’s why my sharing’s 90/10 too, pretty much. Two reasons:

  • It’s easier to target your audience with your own material – you know the audience you want to reach; and
  • Your audience isn’t served well if you consistently repost others’ material which they’ve already seen in their social stream many times before.

Consider that it’s YOUR social media account. This is why you need to…

Be Yourself When You Share.

Social media is social, but I’m not comfortable posting images of my lunch or my coffee shop snacks to social media, nor do I do post that sort of material for clients. Other people are comfortable with that, and that’s perfect for them. Be yourself. If people don’t like what you’re sharing, they’ll stop following you, as they should.

Curate Content on Social Media, if That’s Your “Added Value.”

I’ve been on Twitter since 2007, and a few years ago, my entire @angee Twitter account was others’ content, which I curated. That seemed to work well at the time. However, the Web’s constantly changing. It wouldn’t work for my audience today, because too many others are doing that. Your account becomes just another “me too”, in that case.

However, if curating content on a social media account is your value-add to your audience, and ten other people aren’t doing it, go for it. You can devote a social media account purely to curated content, with just a smattering of your own content. It all depends on your audience, and on YOU.

So, in summary, do whatever you feel will work for your audience. Adjust as needed, and as the Web changes. Most importantly of all, have fun with it. Your social media accounts are yours, and as long as you’re creating and adding value, and entertaining, you’re doing it right.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Blog Power: 2 More Essential Content Tips

Blog Power: 2 More Essential Content Tips

Everyone’s blogging today; if you don’t have a blog, you feel guilty. However, blogging isn’t for everyone. It takes time. Your time may well be better spent. On the other hand, if you feel that a blog would benefit your business: create one. A blog can be immensely valuable for your business, in ways you’d never expect.

Well over a year ago, I created My Top 10 Content Tips; I’ve just updated the post. Its accompanying slide deck has had over 3,600 views on SlideShare. Reading over the post, and considering the amount of content that’s produced daily, here are two more essential content tips.

1. Keep It On Your Blog!

Many companies decide that rather than blogging, they’ll devote all their resources to their Facebook or Google+ page, and send out streams of tweets. Blogging just seems too time intensive, and demanding.

That’s true. However, your blog is media that you own. Content you post on other sites is at another company’s mercy. Not to mention, it’s hard to find again. Put your content onto your blog first, then tweak it for use elsewhere.

2.  Automate Sharing, But Don’t Turn Into a Robot.

Apps like Buffer make it easy to schedule your blog post reshares, and social media messages, but don’t schedule everything. Show up on social media websites, and get social.

You’ll find many useful content tips on social media. For example, I’d never considered “plussing” my own posts and comments on Google+, but Mike Allton advises that you do:

First, within Google+, you’ll need to understand that there are three possible “Social Signals” on every post: a +1, a Comment and a Share. Every Google+ user can take any of those actions on a single post, including the original post owner. Creating the post itself does not count. But as each social signal is effected, the +1 count on any one single link included in the post goes up. To a maximum of 3 +1′s from any one unique user.

You don’t need to spend hours on social media websites, but after you automate, pop in every day or two and plus your shares, and those of others. And of course, interact. Social media networking is called that for a reason.

If you missed the previous article, read the first of the top ten blog content tips here.

 

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Book Marketing: Get Results in 30 Minutes a Week

Book Marketing: Get Results in 30 Minutes a Week

Book marketing can be amazingly simple, but nevertheless effective. Even if you hate marketing, you can get great results in just 30 minutes a week. Schedule it once a week, or split it up, into three ten-minute sessions. Even if you hate the idea of promotions, you can do it.

My students ask questions like:

* “HOW do I market?”

* “Is this enough?”

* “What should I do now?”

You’ll find some easy marketing ideas below. Essentially it doesn’t matter WHAT you do, as long as you do some promotion.

A digression: hate marketing? Many hardcore writers do. (Me included, oddly enough, I’d rather write… :-)) If you hate, hate, hate the idea of promotion, forget about it. Write another book. End of digression.

1. Set Up Your Social Media Profiles – Choose One or Two Social Media Websites.

We’re not counting this activity in your 30 minutes a week. Setting up your social media profiles may take you 45 minutes or so, but you only need to do it once. Review your profile every couple of months, as you book marketing activities change, and tweak as necessary.

Before you start, develop some creative material – images. Your creatives can be book covers in various sizes, some CTAs (Calls to Action: advertising images), images of yourself, image quotes from your book, or anything else you choose. Your creatives grab people’s attention. Use canva.com to create FAST images, completely for free.

Now set up profiles on two social media websites. You can choose any two you like. Book marketers get results on Facebook, Twitter and Google+, however your mileage may vary. Choose the two with which you’re most comfortable, and set up your profile pages on these sites.

Here’s my Twitter profile page.

Angela Booth on Twitter

Essential: use your book’s cover as a profile background image: people need to associate you with your book. If you’re promoting several books, create a collage of your book covers, and add the link to your Amazon Author Page on your profile.

2. Create Types of Social Media Shares.

Your types can include:

Shares of Others’ Material.

Let’s say you’ve written a nonfiction ebook about online dating. You an reshare the content of influencers in that niche, or of anyone in the niche, as long as you feel it’s useful and important to your followers. If you’re writing suspense fiction, your can reshare other suspense writers tweets and posts – readers are always looking for great new books.

Thoughts and Questions.

What are you reading? You can post your current reading using the hashtag #amreading. Alternatively, what are you writing? Post using the hashtag #amwriting.

I’m currently on a Georgette Heyer kick, so I’m posting #amreading, as you can see in the Google+ post below.



You can also ask questions of your audience. What are they reading? Who’s their favorite character?

Book Announcements, and Promotional Material.

You were wondering when we were going to get around to promotions, weren’t you – here we go. :-) Promote away. Use your ebook’s covers, quote images, and anything else you’d like. Tweet and post snippets from your book.

VITAL… include your Amazon link, please, so people can buy your book.

It’s easy to forget to do this. I often read something about a book in which I’m interested, and when I search for the retailer link, there isn’t one. I need to copy and paste the book’s title into Amazon… and sometimes I think – “later.” Make it as easy as possible for people to click through to your ebook on Amazon or wherever you’re selling.

Reshares of Your Own Blog Posts.

If you’re running a blog, don’t be shy – reshare your blog posts. Over time, you’ll develop a lot of content. I have around 4,000 posts on one blog, and 2,000 on another. You’ll develop masses of content too: use that content to promote your books.

3. Create Draft Content for Social Media Posts.

I create a week or two’s worth of draft content in a spreadsheet on Sunday evenings. It’s become automatic now, and takes me around 15 minutes. It may take you a little longer when you start out.

4. Schedule Your Content: Use Buffer.

Buffer makes it simple to line up your content for sharing. You can schedule for specific times, or use the Settings scheduler, and so that your posts go out at regular times. Buffer is free for a basic account, and it’s all you need for book marketing.

So, there you go. Once you’re set up with the types of material you’re sharing, you can create and schedule your book marketing in just 30 minutes a week. See? Marketing can be easy. Dip into your social media accounts for a couple of minutes occasionally during the week, to respond to people.

Enjoy Writing? Imagine Starting and Running Your Own Highly Successful Copywriting Business.

Copywriting Business: Master Class

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, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Super-Fast Product Creation: Buy PLR and Profit

Super-Fast Product Creation: Buy PLR and Profit

I love product creation; it’s been a mainstay of my online business since 2002. However, there are hassles. Product creation takes time, above all. You can cut down on that time dramatically when you buy PLR.

Not familiar with PLR? I’m currently offering PLR to three products which I’ve withdrawn, and explained PLR like this:

If you’re not familiar with the term, “private label rights” products, commonly referred to as “PLR”, are products to which you have extensive rights. You can put your name on the products and sell them as your own; you can add and remove text; you can split them up to make new products; you can offer them as bonuses to your own products… basically, you can treat them as your own, and use them in any way you choose.

How to Use Purchased PLR in Your Own Products.

You can use PLR products you’ve purchased in many different ways:

  • To kickstart your own product creation;
  • As social media content;
  • As bonus added-value material to your own products;
  • On membership sites;
  • In newsletters you’re sending out to customers;
  • As the basis of audio, video or presentation material you create.

I created a monthly newsletter for a UK gym company for several years, and bought health and fitness PLR extensively to repurpose in the publications. The balance of new content to PLR was around 50/ 50. The company was happy, because they got inexpensive content, and I was happy because I spent less time on the newsletter each month.

When I created a social media campaign for a marketing company, I used a lot of edited PLR in tweets, Facebook postings with images, and as fast and easy reports. When you look at PLR as raw material, it’s like baking a cake. You have the basic flour, fat and protein. By the time you’ve mixed it up and baked it, the raw material is completely transformed.

Death by PLR: Avoid It – Use PLR as Raw Material.

Once Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) became popular a few years back, Internet marketers jumped on it mindlessly. They shoveled PLR onto the Kindle bookstore. Predictably, Amazon got very cross, and swept away much PLR.

Pay close attention to what Amazon says:

Public Domain and Other Non-Exclusive Content

Some types of content, such as public domain content, may be free to use by anyone, or may be licensed for use by more than one party. We will not accept content that is freely available on the web unless you are the copyright owner of that content. For example, if you received your book content from a source that allows you and others to re-distribute it, and the content is freely available on the web, we will not accept it for sale on the Kindle store. We do accept public domain content, however we may choose to not sell a public domain book if its content is undifferentiated or barely differentiated from one or more other books.

You can use PLR as the basis of your own products. Remember what I said about using PLR as raw material, then baking it into something which looks completely different?

I don’t use PLR on Amazon; I publish content under several pen names, and ghostwrite ebooks for clients. However, if I wanted to sell an ebook on Google+ for small business for example, I’d buy good PLR and use it as raw material. Why not? It would kickstart my own thinking, and by the time I’d revised, edited and added fresh content, its own mother wouldn’t recognize it as PLR.

If you’re wary of product creation, even though you know it would benefit your business, take a fresh look at it, with the idea of judiciously using PLR in your new products. It saves time.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Writing Workflows: Write and Repurpose With Markdown

Writing Workflows: Write and Repurpose With Markdown

We’re all writing more these days: business documents, social media updates, and endless emails and messages. I’m constantly refining my writing workflows, and I’m sure you are too.

Markdown is at the heart of my workflows. I started using plain text with Markdown syntax as my preferred writing environment several years ago, purely to save time.

Here’s why. You can transform a Markdown document into HTML, RTF, or PDF and even EPUB in just a second or two. It doesn’t matter what I use to create a document; I can open it in Marked, and export it to other formats more or less instantly.

Markdown documents are just text, so you can write in Markdown on your phone or tablet – any text editor can create Markdown documents. I wrote a couple of blog posts on my phone at the hairdresser’s yesterday, for example. This morning I copied them to MultiMarkdown Composer, my current favorite Markdown editor to save as files. Then I copied the files as HTML with a couple of keystrokes, and posted them to a blog.

Write App: Elegant Simplicity and Perfect for Social Media

Since I write in Markdown, I’m always checking out text editors which offer Markdown options; I end up buying far too many of them. My excuse? Time. If an app helps me to save an hour or two a month, it’s well worth the money.

When I spotted that Write was out of beta, I had to get it. I’d heard many good things about it. TNW’s Nick Summers called it “gorgeous”, and he’s right.

Write’s perfect for writing snippets – short social media updates, and then repurposing them. For example, you might tweet something, then expand the tweet into a Google+ post, and expand it further into a blog post, or develop it into a presentation.

Alternatively, you can head in the other direction: create tweets and other social media posts from Markdown documents.

write app

As you can see from the above image, Write’s window is divided into three sections. Your library on the left (folders on your computer, Dropbox, iCloud, Google Drive etc.) The center area offers a search query box, and a file list. Then there’s the editor, which you can pop out into a free-floating window, either full-screen, or not.

However, Write really shines when it comes to sharing, as you can see in the image below.

sharing with write app

Write offers the usual Markdown sharing as HTML, PDF et al as primary options. I love the instant sharing to Twitter and Facebook. Just select a snippet, and if you’ve set up your computer to send social media updates, you can post an update at a click.

Write’s the Perfect Editor if You Use Markdown – or Even if You Don’t.

Use Write for:

* Quick social media updates;

* Emails, and documents you want to attach to emails;

* Web content;

* Basic business documents;

* … anything you choose, really.

I couldn’t see myself drafting long documents in Write, I prefer Scrivener. But for short documents, it’s perfect: you can focus on your writing, and can share it in many formats. My writing workflows have benefited from Write; yours may too.

Discover the Copywriting Course That Builds Your Copywriting Business in Seven Days

The Copywriting Course That Builds Your Copywriting Business in Seven Days

Seven Days To Easy Money: Copywriting Success helps you to build your own copywriting business in just seven days. It’s a complete program, with everything you need. Each day you have objectives and tasks. Just complete the tasks, to build your business.

Coaching is included, and no additional materials or purchases are required. Join us, you’ll have fun, as you build your business. :-)

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

3 Essential Copywriting Secrets for Today’s World

3 Essential Copywriting Secrets for Today’s World

Copywriting – writing to sell – is in many ways much easier than it used to be, it’s also harder, in today’s busy world. Back in day, you could write catalogue copy, or a brochure, and call it done. Today, both your catalogue copy and brochure-like websites need to be tagged with meta data, and supported with social media marketing.

Let’s look at three essential copywriting secrets for today’s busy and fragmented audiences.

1. Emotion First – THEN Make Them Think.

Arouse emotion in your audience first, THEN make them think. The old copywriting formula, AIDA (Attention, Interest, Desire, Action) is based on emotion. Emotion not only grabs attention, but it also inspires action. AIDA is useless without emotion.

The easiest way to arouse an emotion is via visuals. A recent post on visual content on the Buffer blog made this point:

The brain processes visuals 60,000 times faster than it does text. We are wired to take in visual content faster and more effectively than we are words. Ninety percent of the information sent to our brains is visual; we’ve been trained to consume visual content as quickly as we can.

Bigger is better with visuals – viz print magazines and social media – for two reasons: emotion, and memory.

I’m a writer, so I’m heavily focused on words, but visuals allow you to arouse emotions faster in your audience, and get them to remember more. Here’s an interesting PDF from hp on the power of visual communication.

Copywriting is persuasion, and there’s no persuasion without emotion.

2. What’s the Big Idea?

Every copywriting project depends on the power of a big idea, such as the idea (and the emotion) behind David Ogilvy’s classic Rolls Royce ad.

Your big idea is the message. You’ll leverage your message with content, so the more you consider your message, and its implications, the easier it will be to leverage.

Politicians know the persuasive power of repetition. They stay on message. You may repeat words in your copy, however, beyond words, focus on the emotion, and your big idea.

3. Leverage Your Message With Content.

Copywriting isn’t just advertising in today’s world.

From The art of adverts: How social media is changing the way companies speak to consumers:

“The guys get together in the morning and say, ‘what’s happening, what’s in the news and in the online space’,” he says. “It might be something relevant to one of our brands and we need to come up with an idea and get it out there in a short space of time.”

Today, your copy needs to be leveraged with content, in any way you can manage it.

You’re running a small business; you don’t have an advertising agency to do your social media for you. Indeed, social media can seem like a nuisance. At best, it’s an afterthought.

What if you switched that around, and made social media the focus of your advertising? Start paying more attention to social media. You may find that social media not only enhances what you spend on advertising, but helps you to spend less.

As John Wanamaker said: “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I don’t know which half.”

In summary, consider emotion first, then focus on your big idea, and leverage it with content. These copywriting secrets are essential today.

Enjoy Writing? Imagine Starting and Running Your Own Highly Successful Copywriting Business.

Copywriting Business: Master Class

You can earn while you learn to write copy in ten weeks. Join us in the Copywriting Master Class.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Buffer App: Now With RSS Feeds

Buffer social media app

As I clicked around Buffer this morning (as you do), I noticed a Feeds New! tab. What…? I had to query Buffer’s Help for “RSS” to see what it was all about. You add your blogs’ feeds’ links to the tab, and Buffer drags in your latest posts.

Then, to add a post to any of the social media sites you’ve set up, you simply click Add. Total genius. One more reason to adore Buffer.

TNW reports:

“This has been one of our most requested features from big publishers to small bloggers and individuals who just want to follow their favorite blogs and share their stories alike,” explains Buffer co-founder Leo Widrich.

Buffer just keeps getting better. This new feature is a huge time saver.  Kudos to Buffer. You’re using Buffer, aren’t you? :-)

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.