Tag Archives: social media

Writing Journal 68: Manage Your Social Media Images

Writing Journal 68: Manage Your Social Media Images

My writing journal for Sunday October 19, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

It’s Sunday, a short writing day for me. The mystery novel is still chugging along like the little engine that could. I managed 2,500 words. A lot of first-draft junk content, but some good. (Even if I say so myself.)

Then on to nonfiction; just 1,200 words, but that’s OK.

Honey’s breakfast, and then my own. I eat my toast while responding to students’ exercises.

Which reminds me: today is the final day of the special offering on 8-Hour Wins; check it out before the offering ends.

8-Hour Wins: Create and Sell Products in Just 8 HoursThe 2015 version of the Easy-Write Process went live today, too.

Mac OS X Yosemite is powering along. Only one minor hiccup. Dropbox wouldn’t load until I installed a new version. I’m sure that’s my fault. It doesn’t have an in-app notification for new versions, so I forget to update.

One thing I’ve noticed with Yosemite; it’s speedier. Very nice. I’d still recommend waiting before you upgrade; that’s the sensible thing to do.

No time to walk this morning. Today’s my big blogging day, so I spend the rest of the morning organizing blog content and social media postings.

Manage Your Social Media Images

I’m always looking for ways to improve my workflow, especially with social media. Denise Wakeman posted about MavSocial. It’s a social media management tool specifically for images.

To manage images, I use Creative Cloud, but even with Adobe Bridge to help, I still get into a tangle. I’ve got text content, images for dozens of social media campaigns, promotional materials and heaven knows what else. Keeping it all straight is not only frustrating, it’s next to impossible.

Currently I use spreadsheets, Curio and OmniOutliner to keep things going, but it’s still migraine-inducing.

So I tried MavSocial out immediately. Within a few minutes, I’d uploaded some images, edited one, posted a tweet, and scheduled another one. Very impressive. Usually it takes forever to figure out a new tool, but MavSocial is well laid out. I like the idea of creating campaigns, and checking the results in one dashboard.

I’ll spend more time reviewing it, but at first glance, it’s well worth incorporating into my workflow.

A couple of days ago, I mentioned Canva for iPad. I installed it last night. If you’re familiar with the Web app, you’ll be creating with the iPad app soon as you install it. You can even access all the images you’ve created on Web Canva from the app.

Time for my Sunday commitments.

Sunday blogging

I’m back, and it’s more Sunday blogging. I like to do as much preparation as I can on Sunday, so that the week’s blogging flows smoothly.

By the time I’ve brainstormed and researched posts, and have created draft posts for each blog, it’s time for my general weekly plan and review session.

With that done, everything’s ready for another week.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Slideshare Trick: Your Deck As a Gif

Kindle Fiction: Write Hot-Selling Short Stories

If you use Slideshare, you may like this clever trick: Gifdeck turns your decks into gifs. Just go to Slideshare and get the URL for your deck, and paste it into Gifdeck. Within a few seconds, it’s created a gif for you.

You can add the gif anywhere you’d like — into a blog post, or into Twitter, or even into an email message.

It’s an easy way to get more mileage out of your presentations.

Oh — here’s the real presentation. The gif is too fast to read. However, it does get attention. It’s a way of pepping up your social media content very simply.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Writing Journal 31: Images and Social Media

Writing Journal 31: Images and Social Media

My writing journal for Friday, September 12, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

With any luck at all, at my current rate of progress, I should be ready to do a first quick “slash and burn” edit on both the novella, and the nonfiction book I’m ghostwriting for a client this weekend. Happy days. :-) I managed 2,000 words of fiction, and 1,800 words of nonfiction. I’d like to do more of both today, but I’ve got a couple of meetings this afternoon, so that’s unlikely.

I got caught up with email last night, mostly. I’ve still got a couple of student short stories to read.

This morning’s email is light; I just need to make some notes and Julia can handle the bulk of it.

It’s time for Honey’s breakfast and my own. She’s a riot. She has a very strict routine, and nothing happens outside that routine. You can set your clock by her. She knows what time she has breakfast, when she goes out to play, and when it’s time for lunch.

One day I had to get up early to pick someone up at the airport;  no way could I get her out of her comfy bed. It was outside her routine. When I got back, she ignored me for an hour, as she does when something doesn’t go her way.

That said, she’s the only dog we’ve ever owned that you can safely leave in the garden with open gates, and not worry that she’ll streak through them. She’s a real little lady, who cares what you think about her. She hates it if you raise your voice; she needs a calm environment.

Time for my own breakfast, while reading a student’s short story. I make a few notes, so that Julia can send the feedback.

Next, I need to check over my draft blog posts, add some content, and edit some images. I like to have a good selection of images, so I send reminder emails to my blogging clients to get them to me.

Images and YOUR blog

Many bloggers don’t create images for their blog posts. This is a shame, because it means that they get fewer social media shares. I grind my teeth whenever I find a wonderful blog post, which I’d love to post to Pinterest, and there’s no image. The Web’s all about images now.

So, even if you’re a writer, and you’re as sniffy about pretty pictures as I used to be, please source some images for your posts, so we can share your posts.

If you don’t have any images that you’re comfortable sharing, use the one of the many stock photo libraries to grab images. They might cost you a few dollars (most are cheap), but look on it as a business expense. If you can’t afford that, use websites like Photopin which offer free Creative Commons images.

OK, time for my walk.

Make freebies the heart of your social media push

I’m back. It’s time to create an ebook for a copywriting client who has me on retainer. I create an ebook a month for his website, and he’s getting good traffic and conversions when he offers them for free, in exchange for a subscription to his mailing list.

Yesterday this blog post on getting leads from Pinterest gave me some insights on how we can get more traction from Pinterest for his ebooks. Usually, I’d create just a couple of images, and would pin them to several of the clients’ boards over a month. Alisa Meredith suggests that you create LOTS of images for your lead generators.

It’s time to leave for my meetings now. I’ll have lunch while I’m out. With luck, I’ll be back in time to do more with the company history I’m ghostwriting.

Back again, and it’s very late. Both meetings ran over time. A quick daily review, and a word count total, and that’s it for another week.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Your Google+ Business Page: Create An Asset

Your Google+ Business Page: Create An Asset

Got a Google+ business page? Me too. However, a Google+ business page has been a hard sell to my clients: “I’ve got a Facebook page, why do I need a Google+ page too?” 

The short answer: Google. Google’s been promoting Google My Business:

Google My Business connects you directly with customers, whether they’re looking for you on Search, Maps or Google+.

Here’s the FAQ to Google My Business. Basically, Google’s tying everything together — search, maps, and social media via Google+, and it all starts when you set up your Google+  business page and verify your address. (Google will send you a postcard.)

Look on your Google+ business page as an asset: one you need to promote your business effectively.

 What about SEO?

Search engine optimization (SEO) will always be important. The “search engines” are just software scripts. Your website and blog pages need meta data to tell the scripts what each page is about. Your pages still need to be “optimized”, in a sense. And you still need links to your pages. Nothing has changed; Web content is what it always was.

However, social media is becoming ever more important, and search engines are getting smarter. Google wants to tie all your business information together  to help your customers to find you, and to do a better job of indexing the Web.

So, a Google+ business page as gone from “meh, who needs it? I’ve got Facebook”, to becoming the foundation of your online marketing. Don’t fight it. Click the big blue “Get on Google” button on the top right of Google My Business, and get started. :-) As Google is at pains to point out, it’s free, so it won’t cost you anything.

You’ve got a Google+ business page, now what?

Start posting to your page, and getting followers to your page. Social Media Examiner gives you 11 ways to get followers to your Google+ business page:

One of the first tips I give people is to use your Google+ personal profile to interact with your Google+ business page content.

Since Google’s using your information for Web search, it’s vital that you show willing, and get some content on your Google+ business page, and some engagement going too.

Google advises:

Keep your customers in the know by posting updates, news and special offers on your Google+ page. Your customers can +1 and comment on the content you post, giving you a direct connection to their feedback.

Treat your page as you’d treat your other social media pages. Promote your page on your website, and ask customers to respond. As Google suggests, make it worth their while to visit your page and interact by posting special offers for them.

So there you have it. Like it or not, your Google+ business page is important. It’s a vital asset for your business. You need one. Google has spoken. :-)

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Pinterest Traffic: Start Pinning

Pinterest Traffic: Start Pinning

Are you missing out on Pinterest traffic? Chances are that you are.  One of my clients was curious about a sudden flow of traffic from Pinterest, and called me. I’d been encouraging him to try Pinterest for at least a year, but he’d taken a look at the site, and had decided it wasn’t for him.

Then he got traffic from kind people who pinned his products, and he’s now decided that Pinterest should be part of his social media marketing endeavors.

Pinterest Traffic: Get images, and a Pinterest account

Here’s what I love about Pinterest: your pins are long-lasting. Unlike Twitter or Facebook, your pins don’t have a shelf-life which is measured in minutes. You can get traffic from stuff you pinned months ago.

If you’d like to get started with Pinterest, start by looking at the images on your offerings. If you don’t have images, create some.

This doesn’t need to be a major investment. One of my client has a B2B website offering services. He’d never considered images. We developed some templates with placeholder images  with the help of a designer. He can take photos himself, then drag them into the templates, save, and upload them in a couple of minutes.

Once you’ve created some images, get a Pinterest business account. Create a couple of boards for your business. Make one board business-related, and the other fun — Pinterest is a social media network. Some ideas:

Create Pinterest boards with specific questions your website’s visitors have, or around a specific theme. For example, if you have an online business selling accessories, create boards for each kind of accessory, and for your designers too. Check out what major brands are doing. Keep your boards light-hearted.

Give Pinterest a try. You may be surprised at how effective it can be as an additional source of traffic to your website.
, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Social Media Sharing: Your Own, or Others’ Content?

Social Media Sharing: Your Own, or Others' Content?

Social media sharing can be a challenge, especially the ratios of the various kinds of content. Should you blast out your own material, or should you minimize your own input, and focus on sharing others’ content which you hope your audience will find valuable?

A couple of authors asked about social sharing ratios in reference to the article on book marketing in 30 minutes a week.

Kevan Lee of Buffer posted “6 popular ratios for sharing content on social media”, and you can certainly follow others’ formulas. However, it all comes down to your audience, your time, and the social media network.

To be honest, I don’t think about it too much. Of course, I don’t consider myself a social media expert. Apropos of social media experts, B.L. Ochman’s funny post: Twitter bios show epic growth – to 297,897 – of self-proclaimed social media gurus will make you smile. “Social media whores”? Who knew? :-)

As regards sharing, I’m with Buffer. Kevan Lee said:

Our social media updates are 90 percent our own content and 10 percent from others, and many days those numbers are even more lopsided.

Here’s why my sharing’s 90/10 too, pretty much. Two reasons:

  • It’s easier to target your audience with your own material – you know the audience you want to reach; and
  • Your audience isn’t served well if you consistently repost others’ material which they’ve already seen in their social stream many times before.

Consider that it’s YOUR social media account. This is why you need to…

Be Yourself When You Share.

Social media is social, but I’m not comfortable posting images of my lunch or my coffee shop snacks to social media, nor do I do post that sort of material for clients. Other people are comfortable with that, and that’s perfect for them. Be yourself. If people don’t like what you’re sharing, they’ll stop following you, as they should.

Curate Content on Social Media, if That’s Your “Added Value.”

I’ve been on Twitter since 2007, and a few years ago, my entire @angee Twitter account was others’ content, which I curated. That seemed to work well at the time. However, the Web’s constantly changing. It wouldn’t work for my audience today, because too many others are doing that. Your account becomes just another “me too”, in that case.

However, if curating content on a social media account is your value-add to your audience, and ten other people aren’t doing it, go for it. You can devote a social media account purely to curated content, with just a smattering of your own content. It all depends on your audience, and on YOU.

So, in summary, do whatever you feel will work for your audience. Adjust as needed, and as the Web changes. Most importantly of all, have fun with it. Your social media accounts are yours, and as long as you’re creating and adding value, and entertaining, you’re doing it right.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.