Kindle Unlimited Makes Sales For Authors

Kindle Unlimited Makes Sales For Authors

I shared the story of my ill-fated “let’s not publish new stuff in KDP Select” experience on my Just Write a Book Blog. I definitely lost money with that little experiment. All the ebooks I which I hadn’t enrolled in KDP Select, and which were therefore not available in  Kindle Unlimited, are selling well now that I’ve enrolled them.

It’s amazing to me that I’m making many, many sales, just because the ebooks are free to Kindle Unlimited subscribers. Not what I would have predicted, but there it is.

Here’s one more author’s experience, Let’s Talk Numbers: It’s official! If you write novels, the new KU is AWESOME!:

“Not too shabby! As you can see, I was averaging about 15-20k pages read per day for a monthly total of 604,268 pages read in July. Multiply that by the official $0.0058 per page payment, and you get $3504.75 for the month.

“Thirty five hundred bucks!!! That’s almost twice what I earned from sales in the same time period!! And keep in mind that OGDDA didn’t come out until August 1, so these are earnings from only one title in one month.”

It’s not just novels, of course. I write a lot of short fiction, because I like to write, and short fiction is fun, and the read-throughs are there as well.

What I take from this: Amazon wants people to read. When people read, authors make SALES.

Test, to see what works for you

When Amazon changed the Kindle Unlimited (KU) rules, and decided to pay authors by pages read, the shrieks of doom abounded.

A couple of my Serial Fiction Bonanza students asked me whether Kindle Unlimited would still “work”. I told them that I trust Amazon to look after their customers — readers. And what’s good for readers is good for authors.

I’m a reader first. From the time I became aware that people wrote the stories I loved to read, I decided that one day I’d write books too.

As a reader, I adore Amazon. I can order as many books as my wallet will accommodate, whether the books are recently published, or were published years ago. Amazon is heaven for people who love to read.

It’s my experience that Amazon is heaven for authors, too. Your mileage may vary of course; everyone is different.

Test. See what works for you. If you decide that you don’t want to give Amazon exclusivity, that’s fine. You don’t have to, but if you haven’t tried KDP Select, test it. You may be surprised that it sells ebooks for you.

Have fun. :-)

Serial Fiction Bonanza: Get Readers, Get Fans — Make A Solid Income From Your Fiction FAST

Serial Fiction Bonanza: Get Readers, Get Fans — Make A Solid Income From Your Fiction FAST

Serial fiction has been around since the days of Charles Dickens. Self-publishing authors love it. Discover how to write serials in our new four week class. Coaching is included — you’re not writing alone.

By the end of the program, you’ll have published several episodes of your serial fiction. You’ll also be steadily marketing, while you’re writing and publishing.

Join us: you’ll have a lot of fun, and you’ll boost your fiction writing career.

, on Twitter: @angee, and find Angela on Pinterest, too.

How to profit from your writing: online store.

Your Book Proposal: Make It Sell

Your Book Proposal: Make It Sell

Authors tend to panic when writing a book proposal, but it’s a straightforward process. Here’s how to look at it: you’re making a publisher a proposition for a partnership.

Your book proposal is a plan for this partnership, and has two basic elements: an appealing description of your book with some sample chapters, and a plan for marketing your book. The “marketing” aspect is more important than your description of the book, because book ideas are everywhere.

In this article, we’re discussing nonfiction book proposals. If you’re writing fiction, you need to write your novel first. You can then shop it around to literary agents with a query letter, offering a synopsis and chapters.  Alternatively, self publish. If your novel hits the Amazon bestseller lists, you’ll get offers from agents.

Tip: DO NOT write your nonfiction book before you create your book proposal and get a contract

Sadly, you can’t get out of writing a proposal for your book if you hope to get a publishing contract. No one will read your book. Literary agents and publishers read query letters. If they’re interested in your enquiry, they’ll ask you for a proposal.

You need to do your research, then write your proposal. Once the proposal is done, you can send query letters to agents and publishers. You’ll know to whom to send your query, because you researched possible homes for your book before you wrote the proposal.

Which brings us to the most important element in book proposal creation: research.

Research: it’s essential, and exciting

You’ve got an idea for a nonfiction book. You think the book will sell.

Here’s how to proceed:

  • Write a short description of your book, and give it a working title;
  • Research similar books to yours online, and offline;
  • Research the audience for your book;
  • Consider how you’ll market the book.

Here’s an example. Let’s say you’re a dog groomer. You run a grooming salon and boarding kennels. You get an idea for a book “dog grooming the easy way.” Describe the book, and then research, as above.

Here’s why you do all this research up-front, before you start writing. It’s because agents and publishers ask WHY when you send a query letter to them: WHY this book, and WHY now?

Publishers look for bestsellers, because a bestseller keeps them out of the red. They don’t have a crystal ball, so they don’t know where the next bestseller will come from.

At first blush, the dog grooming book looks like an evergreen title, rather than a bestseller. Some publishers like these kinds of titles, because they have the potential to sell for years. These are bread and butter titles, but many fewer of them are being published these days. The exception? Branded series, like the “For Dummies” series of books.

(I’ve just browsed the For Dummies book website. They publish dog-grooming books, so the topic itself is viable. However, to be appealing to a publisher, it needs more.)

If I were writing a book proposal for the dog grooming book, I’d encourage the author to come up with a element which would make the book timely.

 Your book’s competition: know what’s selling

Your publisher will want to know what competition your book faces. There is always competition, so don’t be worried about this, because competition is a good thing — when there’s competition, you know that your subject area is selling. 

Make notes on which books are your own book’s primary competitors. Look at their rankings on Amazon. If you wish, you can check to see how many copies they’re selling each day. The kdp sales rank calculator gives you a rough guide.

In the image below, I checked the Amazon Best Sellers Rank of EL James’ Fifty Shades of Grey, which is currently ranked at 1,630 Paid in the Kindle store. The calculator estimates that it’s selling at 55 to 100 copies a day.

amazon rank calculator

Make a note of all competing titles, with their current sales rank on Amazon.

The competition: how is your book different?

In your book proposal, list the competing titles, and write a sentence or two for each book about the kind of readers the book is targeting.

Aim for five to 10 titles. Now think about how your book could appeal to readers. You’re looking for an angle, a slant, to take with your book, which will target a similar audience to current top-selling titles, but will offer something they don’t.

This is the most challenging part of writing your book proposal, so don’t be surprised if it takes time.

While you’re waiting for inspiration, write the book proposal. Here’s a template you can use from the Ted Weinstein literary agency. The template includes everything you need to cover in your proposal.

You’ll notice that the audience, competing titles, and your marketing plans are prominent. This material is what counts, and it will make the difference in whether or not your book attracts a publisher.

Agents and publishers look at many book proposals each week. Make yours shine: show that you know that publishing is a business, and you take writing and marketing your book seriously. Your book proposal will then stand out in the crowd.

I wish you all success with your book. :-)

Here’s a slide deck covering the concepts in this article


How to Write a Book Proposal That Sells – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

 

If you need help with your book proposal

I create book proposals for clients. Contact me if you need help with yours. If you wish, I can also help you to get literary representation for your new book.

 

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Self-Publish: Write a Book and Publish it Fast (slides)

Want to self-publish? Many of my clients do, because there are many ways to use ebooks in your business. Authors have credibility which you can get in no other way.

Haiku Deck’s huge fun to use, so when I wrote 3 Easy Tips To Write a Book AND Publish It Fast, I decided to create a slide deck for it.

Enjoy. :-)

If you’re writing a book, or would like to, contact me. I offer mentoring as well as book coaching.

write a book book coaching

, and on Twitter: @angee

Will Your Site Die With Google Reader?

Death of Google Reader

If you’re a Web publisher, or do content marketing, some of your website’s traffic comes from Google Reader. Sadly, Google Reader is going away. Soon — on July 1, to be precise.

That’s a worry. What will happen to all those readers who find you via your RSS feed? They may not use Reader directly, but many news readers depend on Google Reader. My own preferred reader, Reeder, certainly does.

When Reader goes, your readers will still get their news fix, but their new news reader may not list your blog.

Check your traffic logs. How much traffic do the news readers send you?

Your traffic might collapse in July. As What If The Google Reader Readers Just Don’t Come Back? | TechCrunch points out:

“As my site has grown, Reader has become an increasingly important way for people to read my site. And it has clearly driven a lot of that growth. That all ends this coming July.”

As many people have pointed out, there’s always email.

Convince your readers to subscribe to your email list

Encourage subscriptions. The challenge is that we all get too much email already, so few people will sign up. I don’t need any more email either. I stuff most of my email in a To Read (one day) folder. We’re all busy.

Is there another solution? Share yours, please.

Angela Booth is an Australian copywriter, Web writer and content strategist. Want your website to do more for your business? Contact Angela via email to set up a chat. She loves to talk about business and the Web.

photo credit: Lawrence OP via photopin cc