Kindle Ebook Cover Creator: Fast and Elegant

Judging by my writing students, sourcing Kindle ebook covers cause more angst that writing a book does. Yes, covers are important. However, you can create them yourself very easily. Perhaps you’ve heard of Canva, the graphics editor? It’s also the easiest ever Kindle ebook cover creator.

Canva does the hard work for you of ebook cover creation for you

Kindle Ebook Cover Creator: Fast and Elegant

In the image above, you can see one of the many images Canva provides for book covers. If you don’t like the image, just upload your own. It takes just minutes to develop your own ecover for your latest Kindle book.

A tip: if you’re writing a series of books, create several ecovers at the same time. Tie the series together with similar images, and use the same fonts. Add all the information which you’ll use for each ebook in the series. Later, when an ebook is ready to publish, just add the title.

As you may know, I have a busy ghostwriting practice. I create cover images in Canvas as a service for my clients. I don’t charge for them; clients are free to hire their own designer. However, it’s so easy to do, I do it so that if they wish, clients can publish to Kindle immediately, then change the cover later.

Canva for Work: coming soon

Canva is becoming the graphic design program of choice for authors, marketers, and others. And Canva for Work is coming soon; I can’t wait to see what’s in store.

If you’d like to receive early notification of the new program, enter your email address.

Your Creative Business: Coaching to Turn Your Creativity into Profits

Your Creative Business: Coaching to Turn Your Creativity into Profits

Want to turn your writing into a creative business? Over the past few months, we’ve had many queries asking when the Your Creative Business coaching program would return, and we’re happy to announce that it’s back. Get started today: put your creativity to work.

, on Twitter: @angee, and find Angela on Pinterest, too.

How to profit from your writing: online store.

Writing Journal 48: Become a Better Writer Via Your Kindle

Writing Journal 48: Become a Better Writer Via Your Kindle

My writing journal for Monday, September 29, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

Happy days. The novella has gone off to the contract editor. She’s fast, so it should be back by the end of the week. As you may know, this is the final in the series of novellas; I’m glad to be done with them. I’m very much like that: when I get close to the end of a piece of writing, I want to see it out the door.

Some months back, a client commissioned me to write a mystery for him. However, in addition to writing the mystery, he wants it to be the first of a series. So, I need to create a sleuth, a character who’ll carry through several books. Luckily, I don’t need to start the novel immediately. My deadline is mid-December, and I’ve given myself this week to think about mystery sleuths.

I’d love to do a humorous animal mystery series, like The Cat Who… but I’d need to be inspired. I don’t think I can plot it cold-bloodedly, but we’ll see.

This morning, I just made some notes; and did a couple of cluster diagrams, to start thinking and planning. By the way, if you’ve been thinking about getting Authentic Writing, as I know several writers have, check out this week’s offering.

Honey’s breakfast, and my own. Email’s light this morning, which is a good thing. I’m almost caught up with it.

Next, it’s time to get on with the book proposal. I’ve heard back from the client, who’s pleased with the way it’s going.

I finished up a blog post too, and hit the Publish button — 5 Ways to Become a Better Writer. To get better at writing, you basically just have to do it. The more writing becomes a habit, the easier it becomes. With my writing students, I know that as long as I can convince them just TO WRITE, most of their challenges will become much, much easier to conquer.

Let Kindle help you to become a better writer

Before 2012, I’d visit the library at least a couple of times a week, and haul home a stack of books. Then I started to read ebooks via the Kindle app on my iPad. I already owned a couple of Kindle devices, but they annoyed me because I’m a fast reader. I adore the Kindle app on the iPad — and on my phone, when I’m out — because I can ZOOM through books.

I started to check whether any book I wanted to read had a Kindle version, and if it did, I bought it. Here’s why: you can highlight any text you like, and it shows up on your Kindle highlights page.

You can visit your highlights page at any time, and think about WHY something affected you. I used to copy quotations from books onto index cards, The cards got stored in files, and I’d never be able to find what I wanted.

If you’re unaware that you have a Kindle highlights page, check it out, it’s very useful; it will help you to become a better writer.

Lunchtime… Today I ended up having lunch at my computer, while reading a couple of student novellas. Apropos of that, I’ve had some questions about editing.

Yes, I offer developmental suggestions, but no line editing

I’ve had a couple of questions about my author services, specifically about fiction editing. I do developmental editing, but I don’t do line editing. Put another way: I’ll help you with your story, but I won’t proofread for you. Big picture stuff, yes. Grammar and word choice, no. If you’re unsure whether I can help, please ask. :-)

After lunch, I worked up a couple of project quotes for clients, and had a chat with the client for whom I’m writing the company history.

Next, I had to do some research for another client. He’s thinking of going into a new market, and wants a rundown of the market and its challenges. I enjoy research, so the time got away from me.

Before I knew it, it was time to return phone calls, and do my daily review, and word counts.

Tonight, I’ll need to spend a couple of hours on the Kindle ebook I’m writing for a client, so I can keep to the deadline on that.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Write An Ebook In 8 Hours Or Less

Write An Ebook In 8 Hours Or Less

Want to write an ebook in a day? You can. As you may know, I write a lot of books, usually for clients. I’ve got a process that I share with you in my Words into Cash: Write and Sell Your Ebook in Just 8 Hours program.

If you’re interested in writing fast and well, I encourage you to check out this program, because we’re withdrawing it on September 7. We’ve got many more programs scheduled for this year and next.

Why write a fast ebook?

Money’s one reason. Would you believe that an ebook on attracting hummingbirds to your home made $500,000 in a single year? People want information on many different kinds of topics.

I love watching birds on my daily walks, and if I had the time and inclination, I could write an ebook on attracting native birds to your garden.

Would it sell? Who knows? If you write a quick ebook, and spend just eight hours on it, it scarcely matters. Some ebooks can be sleepers. You can write an ebook, forget all about it, and months later discover that it’s taken off.

However, important as money is, it’s not the only, or even the primary reason for my clients to write ebooks. They may write an ebook to educate their audience, for the credibility it gives them, or just because a competitor has an ebook and they want one too.

Ebook marketing is hard, right?

Authors can get tied in knots over marketing. They think that “marketing” is a mysterious process, which takes a long time, and is embarrassing into the bargain. No one wants to beg people to read their book.

If you shudder at the idea of marketing, and think it’s hard, let’s look at a simple process for setting your goal for marketing, and your goalposts.

  • Decide on your goal for ebook marketing. Do you want lots of sales, to become known as an author, to sell a coaching program, to sell a product…?
  • Set your goalposts. How will you know when you’ve scored a win? Your goalposts might be getting your ebook into the top thousand ebooks in its category on Amazon. Or they might be getting ten speaking engagements. Or getting your new product into stores across the nation. When you set your goalposts, you define what “success” looks like for you.

Once you’ve set a goal, and the goalposts, marketing starts to look a lot less intimidating.

Setting your goalposts is vital. When I’m coaching business people and authors, I encourage them to look beyond sales, or the number of downloads they get if they’re offering their ebooks for free. Your goalposts – that is, the measure of your success, may not involve large numbers of readers at all.

Here’s an example. One of my clients, a management consultant, published his ebook on Amazon, and had 100 Createspace copies printed. He sends a printed copy of his book to prospects, and leaves several copies behind after he pitches prospects. He’s tripled his client list in the past year.

Would you spend eight hours writing an ebook if you knew it would triple your business? Our Words into Cash: Write and Sell Your Ebook in Just 8 Hours program is available until September 7.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

photo credit: cindiann via photopin cc

Writing Journal 14: Short Stories Sell

Writing Journal 14: Short Stories Sell

My writing journal for Monday, August 25, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

Novellas

Up at 5AM, eager to write. Did more outlining on the current novella, which is #4, and wrote 1,100 words. I could have written more, but spent one timer session to researching so that I can create the meta data for novella #3.

I spent an hour reading #3, in preparation for the edit. I need to get my edit finished, so that I can send off it off to the contracted editor. I promised her the material today, thinking that I could get it done over the weekend, but that didn’t happen.

Also wrote 1,000 words of nonfiction on the client’s book. I’m a little ahead of where I should be, so I stole time from this project for the novella.

Breakfast for Honey, and for me, while reading email. We get a lot of email over the weekend, because students complete their exercises, and are impatient for feedback. So, email takes a little longer today.

Time for a walk, and then time to sort out the week’s schedule with Julia.

Next, I work on a couple of copywriting projects from last week. I always like to leave a couple of days between writing, and editing, to clear my mind. They’re fine, so Julia can send them to the clients.

Blog posts. One for a client blog, and Short Stories Sell, for the freelance writing blog.

I also wrote a blog post for the Just Write a Book Blog, Write a Novel, or a Short Story?

Lunch, at my computer, reading students’ projects.

Short stories SELL (for the first time in decades)

Readers buy short stories. I know that from my experiences with publishing my own fiction to Amazon, and ghostwriting fiction for clients.

Writers think that there’s a catch… Why do short stories sell on Amazon?

I’m sure that it’s because we’re all pressed for time. I download a short story to read because I have a few minutes to relax, and I’m in the mood for a story of that genre.

In the days when I bought hardcover and paperback books, and visited the library every week, I felt obliged to read everything I hauled home. I went to all that trouble, so I should read the books, right? :-) Today, I’ve got 2,000 ebooks on my Kindle. I may read a chapter or three, or I may read the entire ebook.

Consider too, Kindle Unlimited. Readers can download ten ebooks at a time. Why not download a short story? They can finish a story quickly.

So that’s my theory on why short stories sell now: readers like them because they’re a quick read.

You don’t have to write a novel to justify your price

Writers tend to think that if they write a short story, they have to give it away for free, or sell it for 99 cents. Nonsense. Sell your story for $2.99.

Client deadline

Next, I’m on deadline for a long article I’m ghostwriting for a client. I had a chat with him last week to get material. Now I need to add the additional material, and write another draft.

I can chop the article into separate documents in Scrivener, and then drag the snippets around. Then, if I like the structure of the article in Scrivenings mode, I can redo the transitions, and it’s done. God bless Scrivener. Saves so much time.

That’s it for today. :-)

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.