Tag Archives: creativity

Writing Success: How to Avoid It

Writing Success: How to Avoid It

Writing success: every writer wants it, but some actively avoid it. I work with writers every day, and here’s how the avoidance scenario plays out. A writer tells me about a new project. He’s excited. I’m excited too. We discuss it, then the writer gets to work.

A couple of weeks, or a month later, I ask the writer about the project, and he’s “thinking” about it. Uh oh. We talk about the one big secret of writing — writing, not thinking — and the writer’s enthusiastic again.

Time passes. The writer contacts me to ask me about something else. I resist the temptation to bang my forehead against my desk. No, I don’t yell at him: What about PROJECT X? I know what happened. Project X is dead, dead, dead.

If you don’t create it, it won’t succeed.

No one is guaranteed success, but you can actively avoid success if you lose heart and inspiration and don’t create.

From Beck Gives Us A Lesson In The Arc Of Content Marketing in Forbes:

Beck took a chance with the content. He didn’t focus group it. He just released it and waited to see what happened. His “research” was the world’s actual reaction. We could all stand to be this bold with our content marketing.

If the idea is great, it will be discovered.

No one can guarantee your success. Before Amazon launched the Kindle, authors got used to rejections. It wasn’t uncommon for an author to write ten books, and have each one rejected… until one was accepted. Then, over time, all her rejected books were published.

Time is always a writer’s best friend, as long as you keep writing.

These days, no author needs to fear rejection. You write a book, self publish it, and keep writing. You don’t know what will happen; you don’t need to know. That book may never be successful. It may never sell more than a few copies. But if you keep writing, you increase your chances of success.

Writing success: if your writing doesn’t succeed, keep writing.

Writers get fixated on projects. A project becomes all-important. So important, that to avoid failure, they let the project die.

Why not do as Beck did? Publish. See what happens. If you keep writing, you won’t obsess. Some years ago I had a multi-book contract with a publisher. One day I was lunching with my editor, who was worried about another book coming out on a similar topic to the one I was working on. I shrugged and said: “it’s just a book.”

My book came out, and sold well for a few years. I didn’t pay much attention, because I was working on other books.

Are you avoiding writing success by not finishing projects? Ask yourself this question…

What will happen if you succeed?

Your life won’t change with success. You’ll still write every day. If you focus on the process — writing — rather than success or failure, you’ll increase your chances of success. So keep writing. :-)

If you’re avoiding writing success, check out the Easy Write Process.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Fear of Writing: 3 Tips to Help

Fear of Writing: 3 Tips to Help

Do you have a fear of writing? If you do, you avoid writing tasks. You procrastinate.

In professional writers, “fear” often feels like resistance. This resistance may be a good thing, as I shared on Google+:

Usually, when I wake up in the morning, I make a cup of coffee and start writing fiction immediately. It’s easiest for me to write fiction first, before I start writing “real” stuff – nonfiction. I was a little spooked this morning when I opened my email instead.

Why was I resisting? Why, oh why wasn’t I writing?

But I went with it. When I finally opened my fiction WIP, the story took off in an entirely new direction. I’m thrilled. I didn’t work on any fiction at all yesterday; I had a couple of client deadlines. It seems my subconscious mind was gestating a new (and better) direction for this story during the downtime on it. I’m pleased.

Is resistance fear of writing? In the above instance, it wasn’t. I wanted to write, but felt that I wasn’t ready. I knew I’d work on the fiction project at some point during the day.

What about a real fear of writing? Can you write anyway? Yes you can. Try these three tips.

1. Switch Your Brain: Be Happy.

This exercise sounds weird, but it may work for you – quirk your lips to the right, to trigger your left brain:

If you pull the left lip back repeatedly, it can trigger the right brain. You may feel sad. Pulling back the right lip can trigger the left brain, and a feeling of happiness.

Go on, try it. It works for me, and it may work for you. You should feel a sudden little jolt of happiness which will make your writing task seem a lot less intimidating, and more fun.

Read the LEFT BRAIN RIGHT BRAIN article which explains the exercise; it’s interesting. A lot of brain lateralization theory has been debunked, but it’s still a useful way to think about creativity and your brain.

2. Start Writing – Write Stream-of-Consciousness Material for Ten Minutes.

I’ve been using this little trick for a couple of decades, and I teach it to my writing students. It puts you into “creative” mode; writing triggers more writing.

Here’s all you do. Get a timer, and set it for ten minutes. Now start writing, and keep writing. Write anything you like, whatever words pop into your head. There’s only one rule: KEEP WRITING, no matter what, until the timer goes off.

You can type, or write by hand, it’s up to you.

Writing for ten minutes changes your mood. I discovered this when I started a daily walking regime. For the first ten minutes of the walk, I hated it. At around the eleventh minute, I started to enjoy it.

You can apply this “ten minute” rule to lots of things. Just keep doing the task for ten minutes, and you’ll start to enjoy it.

3. “I’m scared of writing because…”

This exercise works if you have a deep-seated aversion to writing. You may need to repeat it several times. If you do, it will remove your fear of writing completely. One of my students practiced this exercise several times a week for a couple of months. He has no problems with fear of writing now.

As with the stream-of-consciousness exercise, set a timer for ten minutes.

Write “I’m scared of writing because…” and keep writing for ten minutes. Try to write in whole sentences if you can. If you can’t, don’t worry about it. Again, write whatever comes. Don’t worry about spelling or grammar, or censoring yourself.

If you wish, you can try this exercise using your non-dominant hand (that is, if you’re right-handed, write with your left hand.)

As we’ve said: if you keep repeating this exercise, eventually you’ll stop being afraid of writing. I’ve no idea why it works, it just does.

So there you have it; three tips to help you to overcome your fear of writing, and make writing fun. :-)

Got a writing challenge? I’ve been helping writers for 20 years. Get in touch.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

3 Easy Ways to Get Ideas for Nonfiction Ebooks

3 Easy Ways to Get Ideas for Nonfiction Ebooks

I’ve been advising my students to “write short” when it comes to ebooks; this means writing short stories, and short nonfiction ebooks. A short ebook at $2.99 is an easy sale. A longer ebook is a much harder sale at $9.99, especially for a new author.

If you’re wondering how long your short ebooks could be, I suggest around 20 pages. Since the concept of “pages” is meaningless in ebook terms, around 5,000 words – the length of a couple of articles.

Writers have asked how to get lot of ideas for ebooks you can write quickly. We cover that in detail in Sizzling Success from Short Reports and Short Stories, but here are three of my favorite ways.

1. News Websites: Become a News Junkie.

I’m a news junkie. I spend way too much time browsing news websites each day, but it does have a benefit. You learn to spot trends, and see what people are talking about. Once you get into the habit, you can spot dozens of ideas for short ebooks in a few minutes.

You can just browse news stories, or you can enter a broad topic. I used to write a lot about weight loss, so I entered that into the search query field in Google News.

get ideas from news websites

Here’s the key: don’t bother clicking through to the stories. It’s distracting. You just want a broad sense of what’s new today. So, in the above image, you can see “woman says her weight loss photos were stolen.”

Excellent. (Not for the woman, obviously…) You could certainly write a short ebook on weight loss photos: how taking snaps of yourself daily in a weight loss journal is an effective way to stay on track with a weight loss diet, or similar.

Think broadly when you brainstorm. How about a nonfiction ebook on how to look great in wedding or other special-event photos?

2. Amazon: Look at the Top 100 Bestsellers in Nonfiction.

If it’s in Amazon’s Top 100, in any category, it’s selling a LOT. So cast your eyes over what people want to learn more about today: Amazon’s top 100, paid and free.

get ideas from Amazon

Again, don’t bother clicking through: focus on the book’s titles. You just need a kickoff point for your own brainstorming, so you can come up with great ideas.

3. Pinterest: Images Stimulate Your Creative Mind.

I adore Pinterest. It’s an amazing site, particularly if you’re hunting for ideas. Check out the Popular category; that’s what’s trending on Pinterest right now.

get ideas from Pinterest

OK, maybe you don’t want to write about bow ties, or candles, or popsicles. :-) Or maybe you do. Scroll down the page. Let yourself muse about what people need, that you could write about.

There’s always something new on Pinterest. You’re sure to find topics you’d enjoy covering in a nonfiction ebook.

So, there you have it. Three easy ways to get great ideas for nonfiction ebooks. Happy idea hunting. :-)

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Ebook Covers: Design Secrets for Self Publishers

8 cover design secrets publishers use to manipulate readers into buying books

Whether you’re creating ebook covers yourself, or hire them done, you need to know what you’re trying to achieve, and why you’re trying to achieve it. As Derek Murphy points out in his article, make your cover clever (nonfiction) or emotional (fiction.)

Self publishers don’t need to do it all, but we function as ringmasters in our own little publishing circus. Cover images attract attention to our books, and with any luck at all, readers too.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Best Advice Ever: Ratio Thinking Gets Results

Best Advice Ever: Ratio Thinking Gets Results

Are you getting the results you want? We all want results. When we don’t get them, we tend to think we’re doing something wrong. It seldom occurs to use that we’re not doing something enough.

This was brought home to me by one of my writing students, Chip. His current job was on a short-term contract, so he needed to increase his writing income quickly. We chatted, and mapped out a plan. He decided that he’d contact companies directly, as well as marketing his writing services online.

“A couple of people were interested,” he told me a week later. “But times are tough. No one wants to hire a writer.”

We chatted for a while. We discussed companies’ communications needs in today’s marketplace, and he agreed that maybe he hadn’t put himself in front of companies which truly needed him. He agreed to contact more companies.

If something isn’t working, it’s tempting to change your strategy, rather than thinking that you need to do more of the same. As Leo Widrich, co-founder of Buffer, reports in his article on the pitch deck Buffer used to raise $500,000 as a startup:

One of the most important elements, that we had to learn during our fundraising process was the concept of “Ratio thinking”. Jim Rohn, the famous motivational speaker, probably explained it best: “If you do something often enough, you’ll get a ratio of results. Anyone can create this ratio.”

Take Action to Make Ratio Thinking Work for You

“Ratio thinking” makes the law of numbers work for you. If you do something often enough, not only will you get better at doing whatever it is, but you’ll get results. No results? Change what you’re doing. Once you’re getting results, do more of whatever it is that gets the most useful result. Planning can only take you so far; action counts.

As Leo points out in his article, it all comes down to persistence. If you put your offering in front of 100 people, and you get one buyer, then you should get ten buyers if you put your offering in front of a thousand people.

Persistence isn’t easy. Doubts creep in. What if you’re wasting your time? What if it doesn’t work? What if you need to do something different?

Persist in the face of your doubts. Tennis great Bjorn Borg said:

“My greatest point is my persistence. I never give up in a match. However down I am, I fight until the last ball. My list of matches shows that I have turned a great many so-called irretrievable defeats into victories.”

What happened with Chip? He persisted. And his persistence was rewarded. He’s well on the way to building a stable of quality clients. He’s committed to making ratio thinking part of other areas of his life too. He knows it gets results.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Creative Marketing on a Budget: 3 Tips You Can Use Today

Creative Marketing on a Budget: 3 Tips You Can Use Today

Looking for creative marketing on a budget ideas? There’s never been a better time for do-it-yourself marketing. Social media helps you to tell your story (see tip 3, to choose your story). You can make even contact with reporters at a click, so don’t worry that you’re without a marketing budget. You can more than compensate.

Let’s look at three tips you can use today.

1. Leverage Social Networking Sites Like Pinterest.

Used well, social media wins attention. Blood, sweat, and tears: How we got from 0 to 500K downloads on a budget reports:

We launched a week before demo day and were able to generate a good media buzz (I’ll get more specific later) by piggybacking Pinterest and reach a go-to market that was highly relevant for us at the time.

If you’ve got images to tell your story, Pinterest is for you. In Pinterest Traffic: 3 FAST Tricks You Can Use Today, I suggested:

If you’re used to doing outreach for links, you know how to approach people. Firstly, create some boards, with great images. Pay attention to your pin’s descriptions, and add hashtags. Treat optimizing your boards and pins just as you would any other search engine optimization (SEO) project.

You may start out without an audience, but Pinterest is immensely social, so consider who on Pinterest is attracting your audience, and get in touch with them. Be aware that it’s quid pro quo – do unto others, if you expect them to help you.

Tip: check out my Pinterest program; although it’s nominally for writers, it’s powerful for all small business people.

2. Reach Out: Get Press Any Way You Can.

What would a story in the New York Times do for you? Or a story in your local paper, or a magazine, or on a high-traffic website your audience visits?

10 Ways to Market Your Small Business on a Shoestring Budget reports:

Subscribe to Help a Reporter Out www.helpareporter.com. You can respond to reporters’ queries that are looking for story ideas and resources. Some are small media opportunities, but others are major media outlets that use this service too.

Reporters are in the story business. Reporters desperately want and need great stories. (More on your story in a moment.) Create an elevator pitch for your business, product or service, and ensure it’s newsworthy.

Which brings us to…

3. You’re a Story: Choose “Rags to Riches”, or Anything Memorable.

Remember Colonel Sanders’ secret recipe? McDonald’s special sauce? Did Victor Kiam really like Remington shavers so much that he bought the company?

All three companies leveraged wonderful stories. The truth or otherwise of the stories doesn’t matter. What counts is that your story is memorable. Back in the day, when I was a baby novelist, Jacqueline Susann was a best-selling author. She maintained that she wrote each draft of a novel on different colored paper. Since her books were regarded as trashy, the idea was, trash or not, she worked hard. Maybe Ms Susann really did use different colors for her drafts. Whatever, it was a great story.

The founders of Apple and Google started their companies in a garage. As a marketing trope, rags to riches never gets old.

What’s your story? Your story doesn’t need to be related directly to whatever you’re promoting. The Taco Bell chihuahua didn’t have much to do with fast food. If you’ve got a photogenic pet, like Grumpy Cat, you’ve got it made. Leverage your cutie in your marketing materials.

So there you have it. Think about how you can use these “creative marketing on a budget” ideas to get attention for you next promotion. Start by finding something that’s memorable, then leverage social media and get attention. Marketing in 2014 has less to do with your budget than your creativity.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Buy this on Selz Start selling on Selz

Not in the Mood: 3 Blogging Tips To Get Over Bloggers’ Procrastination

Not in the Mood: 3 Blogging Tips Get Over Bloggers’ Procrastination

Not in the mood to write a blog post? Although I love blogging, half the time I’d rather be reading – or doing something else undemanding. If you allow it, procrastination can kill your blog. For hobbyist bloggers, that’s okay. It’s not okay if your job or your livelihood depends on writing more content.

Check out these three blogging tips for those times you’re just not in the mood.

1. Get Inspired by Google Suggest – Tip Toe Through the Alphabet.

Google’s the savior of recalcitrant bloggers. Hie yourself off to Google, and enter a topic – any topic. Add the letter “a.”

google suggest

As you can see in the image above, I entered “blogging”, plus “a.” I haven’t anything to say on blogging away debt, but I could create a post on any of the other three ideas, even if I wasn’t in a blogging mood.

2. Write a List of Words. Use Them in Your Blog Post.

Challenge yourself. Write a list of words – any words. Author Ray Bradbury used nouns:

These lists were the provocations, finally, that caused my better stuff to surface. I was feeling my way toward something honest, hidden under the trapdoor on the top of my skull.

You can use any words you like. Example: summer, drizzle, sly, sky blue, river, petunia… Now write a blog post, and include those words. Or not, your choice.

Writing a list of words primes the pump. You’ve given the logical side of your brain something to think about. Before you know it, the creative side of your brain gets in on the act, and you’ve written a blog post.

This exercise works well if you need to create your editorial calendar for the month.

3. Temper, Temper – Think About Something That Annoys You.

Got a temper? Me too. I’ve calmed down over the years, but I can create a list of annoyances which get me into a temper without any effort.

Think of something which annoys you. No, don’t blog about that. Use the energy and make a word list. Anger is just energy, and you can direct it anywhere you like. Direct that anger into creating a blog post. Tip: keep your post positive.

So there you have it. Next time you’re not in the mood, try one of these blogging tips. They’re fun.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

photo credit: TheAlieness GiselaGiardino²³ via photopin cc

3 Simple Content Creation Tricks You Can Use Right Now

3 Simple Content Creation Tricks You Can Use Right Now

Desperate for some content creation ideas? Try these three simple tricks. I’ve found them helpful, and so have my students. Big bonus: they’re easy, and they help you to get more ideas.

1. Focus on Problems: No One’s Alone With a Problem.

Life is just one problem after another. Instead of cursing your challenges, try turning them into content. Don’t stop there. What challenges do your clients have? Your team?

Here’s a list of five challenges I’ve been thinking about this morning, and the solutions they inspire. These are content ideas, so make the most of them:

  • Evernote – my primary Evernote account has over 5,000 notes. It’s time to weed the notes out again. With over 50 million users, there’s a big audience for Evernote tips and tricks;
  • Images – I need more images! If you want to get your slice of the attention economy, images are essential. Time I learned to create infographics…;
  • My WordPress.com blog needs attention. I’ll brainstorm some ideas for it, and then will use Trick 2, below;
  • Catching up with my reading, specifically news feeds. Google Reader is long gone; I’ve just purchased ReadKit to help me to manage my feeds. I’m sure some of the 50 million ex-Google Reader subscribers are way behind on their reading too.

No one’s alone with a problem – if you’ve got a problem, turn it into content.

2. Get an Idea, and Implement It.

You’ve written down some problems, and solutions. Implement a solution. Here’s why: once you start implementing, you’ll discover what works, and what doesn’t work. Your readers will enjoy reading about your experiences.

You don’t need to create a case study, although you could. My first problem I mentioned in Trick 1 was too many notes in Evernote. (You can have up to 100,000 notes in Evernote, so my 5,000 notes aren’t necessarily a big deal. I just like to weed out outdated material reguarly.)

I manage goals, clients, and products in Evernote; it helps me to manage my writing, and my business.

Off the top of my head, I can think of two pieces of content I can create right away. As I weed out Evernote, I’m sure I’l think of more:

  • Evernote helper apps. I’ve been meaning to investigate a couple of apps which will help me to manage Evernote. I can create content about my experiences with these apps;
  • Managing your goals in Evernote. I want to try something new. I’ll try it, and then write about it.

3. Pitch Three or More Content Ideas at the Same Time.

If you create content for others, as I do, you need to pitch your content ideas. Try to pitch several ideas, rather then just one. How many of your ideas are accepted isn’t important. You pitch more, because you’ll find that this gives you more ideas; once you’re in a creative mindset, your ideas will flower.

For example, this morning I pitched a content creation schedule for one of my clients. I scheduled six pieces of content right within WordPress, adding several points for each post. I also chose the keywords I was targeting, and located some images. While I was doing that, I got ideas for content I can create for another client.

Once you get into a “content” mindset, you’ll come up with more ideas than you need.

Try these simple content creation tricks. They’re very simple, powerful. Make a note of them too, for the next time you get stuck, and can’t come up with ideas.

, and on Twitter: @angee

photo credit: zetson via photopin cc

Writing Fast: 5 Tips Anyone Can Use

Writing Fast: 5 Tips Anyone Can Use

These days, writing fast is essential. You can’t get out from underneath the Everest of your email Inbox without it, much less accomplish anything of value.

Please don’t get sniffy. Writing fast needn’t mean writing badly. Indeed, you may be surprised that the quality of your writing improves. Your mind thinks in wholes – in patterns. If you spend too long thinking before you start writing you’ll forget what you want to say.

Make it a habit to think on the page:

Before I start a book I’ve usually got four hundred pages of notes. Most of them are almost incoherent. But there’s always a moment when you feel you’ve got a novel started. You can more or less see how it’s going to work out. After that it’s just a question of detail.

PG Wodehouse wrote 96 books, as well as stage plays and collections of short stories. He was amazingly prolific, and a master of language. Thinking on the page worked for him; try it.

Have fun with these tips. They’ll help you to write faster. (And better.)

1. Start. And keep going.

I’m a horrible typist, and didn’t get my first computer – an Apple IIe – until 1983. This meant that I spent my early years retyping manuscripts, over and over. Even then, the pages looked pock-marked by White-Out.

Over the years, I’ve blessed that early training, because it taught me to keep going: I discovered that thinking too much made my mind and fingers stumble.

Launch yourself into your writing – keep going, no matter what. Don’t stop to think, don’t worry about spelling or grammar mistakes, just keep your fingers tapping. You’ll write faster, and better, once you build this habit.

2. Write about your writing: write a letter, if you can’t get started. What’s your point?

PG Wodehouse wrote 400 pages of notes, before he started a novel. You’ll write faster if you write about your writing.

Let’s say you need to write a blog post. OK, start writing. Write yourself a letter about your writing.

I picked up the letter-writing trick from novelist David Morrell:

… my letter to myself, which can go on as long as 24 single-spaced pages—this is a long document—and as I go in, why is this project so important that you would write about it for a year or more, why do you want to write it, where’d the idea come from, and what I begin doing is asking myself questions … and [in one instance in particular] it took me pages to work that out, and so in a way I was outlining, but I was just doing it a different way.

Writing yourself a message is another way of getting started. It breaks your inertia – primes the pump, if you like.

Whenever you get stuck in a project, write to yourself about it. One of my students writes herself email messages; she emails these messages to her Evernote account.

When you write to yourself about your project, you’ll soon discover the point you want to make. Once that’s done, your writing will flow.

3. Use word associations in mind maps.

I’m a huge fan of mind maps. Currently, I use MindMeister. Create a central topic, then just free-associate around your topic. Don’t stop – keep going.

Yes, this is a form of brainstorming. Give yourself five minutes to brainstorm. Mind mapping fixes the “I don’t know where to start” problem; where to start becomes obvious, and you’ll find that you have a lot to say.

4. “XXX” marks the spot.

As we said in the first tip: keep going! Don’t stop. If you need to look up something type XXX. You can search for these items later, once your draft is done. If you stop, you’ll lose the flow. On bad days, it will take you 20 minutes to get your flow back.

5. Research later.

Does this sound counter-intuitive? Maybe so, but it saves time. What’s the point of researching, until you know what you need? “I need to research” is a just a way of procrastinating.

If you truly know nothing about the topic you’re writing about, create a research plan, and limit your research time. I love research, but it’s a huge time sink. Do minimal research before you start writing, but only if you must.

Then write a draft. Now you know what you need to know, look it up, and write your next draft. If you’ve been writing fast, this draft will flow, and it may well be your final draft.

Writing fast is an essential skill. The benefit? Not only will you get more done, you’ll have more fun too. :-)

 Want to write fast and well?

My Easy-Write process will help.

, and on Twitter: @angee

Mind Mapping: 5 Ways To Achieve More With MindMeister

Mind Mapping: 5 Ways to Achieve More With MindMeister

I love mind mapping, and use maps for everything, from business plans to developing books. Over time, I’ve used many apps, because I’ve never found the perfect application. So, when I friend recommended MindMeister, my reaction was: gimme! Who knows? Perfection may be within reach…

Not so. I’ll still use Inspiration, and TheBrain (and a couple of other apps.) However, MindMeister will be joining my arsenal of creative tools, for two reasons: the primary reason is that I like it. Nudging a close second, collaboration: MindMeister is ideal for collaboration, because you can work with others simultaneously on the same map.

If you’re into mind mapping too, check out MindMeister. Here are five ways you can achieve more with it.

1. Collaborate on Projects in Brainstorming Mode.

You can collaborate with others, simultaneously on the same map. You’ll see who’s editing a mind map with you in the footer. You can also chat with your team as you brainstorm and edit. To see who’s made changes and additions; just turn on the History View. All your chats are saved.

I coach writers, so this collaboration feature is wonderful, if I’m mentoring an author with a book, for example.

2. Use MindMeister’s Presentation Mode in Meetings.

MindMeister’s ideal for presentations. Prepare your map, and when you’re ready to go, start the presentation by clicking the presentation icon at the bottom left of the screen. To share your presentation when you’re done, click the share icon, and export in your choice of formats, including PDF and FreeMind.

3. Track Anything. (I’m Tracking My Blogs and Product Updates. )

Much as I love blogging, once you’ve lots of blog posts – I’ve got over 2,000 posts on a couple of my blogs – you tend to lose track of exactly what you were trying to achieve during a particular month, or with a series of posts.

Spreadsheets let you track on a granular level. With mind maps on the other hand, you can get an instant visual overview. Additionally, MindMeister lets you link to topics in other mind maps, so if a particular topic gets too unwieldy, you can start a new mind map for it.

I’m also tracking product updates. I’ve got dozens of ebooks and classes to manage and MindMeiser lets me see what I need to add, and when. History View lets you see the entire history of a mind map, and you can assign and edit tasks easily.

4. You’re Free – Go Mobile: Work and Plan Anywhere.

MindMeister’s mobile apps are clever. Once you’ve installed it on your device, you can work on any of your maps, anywhere you happen to be.

5. Remember Stuff: Take Notes From Meetings, and Books.

Who said what at a meeting? What brilliant questions were asked? Just add notes to a mind map in MindMeister. You’ll easily find this material later, because MindMeister’s search features are fast; you can search an open map, or search all your maps from the dashboard.

These days, I do most of my reading on my iPad. I’m ashamed to admit this, but I’ll buy a Kindle version of a print book I own, simply because it’s easier to both take notes, and to FIND them again. (Sigh, I feel like a traitor to my favorite people, librarians.) Amazon saves every note, and every highlight from every book on your Kindle page. Each of your books has its own page, so you can add the URL to a mind map to view all your highlights and notes for a book.

So there you have it: five ways to achieve more with MindMeiser – you can create up to three mind maps for free. You’ll enjoy it as much as I do. :-)

, and on Twitter: @angee