Tag Archives: copywriting tips

Copywriting Tips: For New and Established Copywriters

copywriting tips

It’s copywriting week on Fab Freelance Writing Blog. Not only will we have copywriting tips galore, we’ll be cover our usual mix of writing guides and inspiration.

Looking around on various forums, I noticed that “copywriting” has morphed into a weird mix of definitions. Content writers who write informative rather than sales material call themselves copywriters, as do copyeditors who are editing books.

When I talk about copywriting, I mean advertising — sales writing.

Here are some articles we’ve published recently.

You, The 30-Second Copywriter

Copywriters sell. They make money. If you’re a struggling writer, and you’d like to become a copywriter, you can become one in 30 seconds or less.

I’ll share my favorite copywriting advice with you in a moment. If you take it on board, you’ll not only be a successful copywriter, you’ll be a success at everything you choose to do. Think I’m kidding? Not so.

Read the article.

Your New Freelance Copywriting Business: 3 Quick Tips

You want to start a freelance copywriting business. Congratulations! Not only is copywriting lucrative, it’s also lots of fun. You need empathy, creativity, and the ability to persuade.

I was lucky; I fell into copywriting completely by accident. At the time, I was a romance novelist. To my mind, real writers wrote novels. Writing copy, on the other hand, was business. I was wrong, and right. Copywriters are real writers, and copywriting is writing forbusiness.

Read the article.

Copywriting Skills Equal More Income

Want to give all your writing a boost? Use copywriting skills. All writing is writing to sell in one way or another. If you tell us something, we want to know why we should care. Forget yourself. Think as your audience thinks.

When a writer says to me: “My book isn’t selling…” or “Help! I need to make $X fast to pay my bills…” I know that that writer’s not using copywriting skills. Please don’t tell me: “I’m not a copywriter,” just consider that you could use a copywriter’s mindset to put yourself in your audience’s shoes.

Read the article.

Advertise Yourself: 5 More Easy Copywriting Tips for Writers

Want to make more money writing? You need copywriting skills. We looked at five easy copywriting tips for writers to help you to advertise yourself. Let’s look at another five.

Read the article.

Copywriting Cash in 2014: 14 HOT Copywriting Tips

Want to increase your writing income in 2014? It’s simple. Learn copywriting. Not only are copywriting skills essential for any writer; you can also provide copywriting services to others.

Let’s look at 14 HOT copywriting tips which will help all your writing this year. By putting just one of these tips into action, you’ll be able to increase your income substantially.

Read the article.
, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

3 Ways Copywriting Skills Can Help Your Sales

Can Copywriting Skills Improve Your Sales?

How many sales are you missing out on today? If you’re a small business person, chances are you’re not communicating as much as you could. You need copywriting skills. Not only will you communicate more clearly, you’ll communicate more. Just about every business has a mailing list; few businesses do anything with the list.

Let’s look at three ways you can use copywriting skills to help your sales.

1. You Can Grab Those Sales You’re Missing.

We mentioned your mailing list. Today, send out an email message to your list. Tell the people who want to hear from you about a new promotion you’re running. You can tell them anything you like; as long as you communicate.

Again: your customers want to hear from you, otherwise you wouldn’t have their email address. Send something.

2. You Can Create Fresh Copy to Win YOUR Customers.

If you’re using your suppliers’ copy, you’re missing out on sales. When you use the same copy all the other distributors are using, your customers are buying from the business which sells the products the cheapest.

You know your products, and you know your customers. Tell your customers stories about how other customers in their area use the products. Give them a reason to buy from you.

3. You Can Make the Most of Social Media: Have You Discovered Pinterest?

Social media isn’t sales. A copywriter’s mindset will stand you in good stead however. Pinterest makes sales, for example:

Yet another study, this one by Shopify, found that orders driven by Pinterest are substantially larger than those produced by Facebook or Twitter. In fact, at $80 per order, Pinterest even tops Google and Amazon.

Dip your toes into social media today; copywriting skills give you the confidence you need.

Check out our Copywriting Master Class, if you haven’t done so already.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Copywriting Tips: The Art of Subtle Persuasion (slide deck)

Haiku Deck is huge fun to use, so I just created this desk of essential copywriting tips.

Copywriting is the art of persuasion.  These copywriting tips  will help you to persuade, and to sell. Thanks to social media, copywriting is integral to your business. Use these tips to persuade in your emails, social media postings, and in your formal marketing too.

Want to see a transcript and the deck notes? Click this link.

, and on Twitter: @angee

Write To Sell: 5 Easy Headline Copywriting Tips Anyone Can Use

Write To Sell: 5 Easy Headline Copywriting Tips Anyone Can Use

If you’re running a small business, you need basic copywriting skills because you’re trying to get attention and persuade people all day long. In other words, you’re writing copy: email subject lines, tweets, Facebook updates, proposals, and blog titles…

Whatever you’re writing, your headline contains the most important words. The headline either grabs someone’s attention, or it doesn’t. Some copywriters spend more time on the headline than they do on the copy.

Here’s some good news. Once you discover easy ways to write headlines, all your writing becomes easier, because you’ve learned to put yourself in your audience’s shoes.

The advertising master, David Ogilvy, said of headlines:

“On the average, five times as many people read the headline as read the body copy. When you have written your headline, you have spent eighty cents out of your dollar.”

Ogilvy is amazing. Two more great Ogilvy quotes to keep in mind when you’re writing headlines:

“I do not regard advertising as entertainment or an art form, but as a medium of information.”

Headlines work well when they’re NEWS: think of your headline as the headline in a newspaper. The Mail Online does a wonderful job with headlines. If you find that Tip 5, “add emotion” is a challenge, read the Mail Online.

“If it doesn’t sell, it isn’t creative.”

Your headlines must be clear, so read them aloud: Tip 5.

Let’s look at our headline tips…

1. Remember WIIFM: “what’s in it for me?”

WIIFM: “what’s in it for me?” is an old copywriting acronym. Put yourself in your audience’s shoes. Think about your ideal customer (or your email recipient, your blog’s readers, etc.) Everyone wants to know what’s in it for them.

WIIFM must be obvious in the headline. Avoid being too “creative,” because you risk confusing your audience.

If you’re stuck on WIIFM, Maslow’s hierarchy of needs can help. You’ll see that sex is a primal need: sex truly does sell. Scan the hierarchy. You’ll figure out WIIFM very quickly.

2. Research, research, and then research some more.

When you need to write important copy, spend half your time on research. This relates to WIIFM. Not only does your headline need to make totally clear what’s in for them, ideally it also speaks to them on a level that’s relevant, right now.

3. Write LOTS of headlines.

I like to sit down (or lie on the floor) and come up with ten headlines.

When you focus deeply, your subconscious mind will get in on the act. You’ll find that an hour later, or early next morning, completely new ideas will come to mind.

The more headlines you write, the more likely it is you’ll hit on something good.

4. Add emotion.

How do you add emotion? You make your audience FEEL something.

Test your headlines on the Emotional Marketing Value Headline Analyzer, when you think you’ve done it.

For inspiration, take a look at these classic headlines.

5. Read it aloud. (To someone else, if possible.)

Yes, read your headline aloud, firstly just so you can hear it. You’ll be surprised that this makes a difference. Some headlines seem OK, until you read them aloud.

Then read your headline aloud to someone else. Just ask whether the the headline makes sense to them. Would the ad catch their attention?

So, there you have it. Keep these headline copywriting tips in mind, not only for your next ad, but for everything you write which needs to grab attention.

 

, and on Twitter: @angee

Copywriting: Speak the Language, Then Sell

Advertising Writing

You’re a new copywriter. You’ve been hired, and you’re eager to get started.

You open a new document in your word processor, and stare at the computer screen, hoping for inspiration…

After a few moments, the cursor’s still blinking, and you’re wondering where you’ll go for lunch. Maybe the new cafe on the corner…

You pull yourself away from thoughts of sandwich fillings.

“Headline,”, you think. “I need a headline.”

You click your way through the folder listings on your computer, looking for your trusty swipe file. You’ll find some inspiration for your headline there, you’re sure of it.

STOP. Please.

You’re going the wrong way.

You may well find inspiration for a headline in your swipe file, but you don’t need that yet. You need to understand your product, and its audience, first. Then you need to get on your audience’s wavelength, and ensure that you’re speaking their language.

I became a writer because I love reading; a copywriter because I enjoy exploring human behavior and language.

Copywriters sell, using words. Even if you’re writing a script, it all comes down to words. To craft words which sell to an audience, you need to understand your audience: their hopes, challenges, and frustrations.

Research first, write later

Depending on the product, researching can be fun, or challenging. Start by asking your client to send you some representative marketing materials, as well as customer comments and questions. If you’re very lucky, and the product is popular, you can do some research on the Web.

Occasionally, research can be very challenging. For example, perhaps the product is completely new. No marketing materials, no customers, nothing at all.

If that’s the case, you’ll need to be creative. The product has competitors, and fits into a market niche. (If it doesn’t, the product has real problems, marketing collateral being the least of them.)

I’ve had a few copywriting jobs which needed lots of creative thinking. One job required me to write a brochure for a new pet food company; I couldn’t interview anyone from the company, and this was before the Web, so I had to be very creative indeed. I held my breath off and on for three days until the client signed off on the copy.

Depending on the job, you may spend a week or two researching, before you think about writing. Usually, you’ll come up with some wonderful ideas for copy while you’re researching. You’ll get what I call “the click” — everything will fall into place, and you’re inspired.

Sometimes inspiration won’t come, and you’ll find yourself where you started out, staring at your blank document, and the blinking cursor. You’re now primed with research however, and it won’t be more than a minute or two before your fingers start flying across the keyboard.

I love copywriting; it’s a wonderful career. Your success rests on your research, and speaking the language of your audience.

Image credit