Tag Archives: content creation

Hate Pinterest’s Search? Go Look!

Hate Pinterest's Search? Go Look!

If you hated Pinterest’s Search function, go and check it out. It’s a lot better. Search now has tags. I first became aware of this when I posted a pin, and Pinterest kindly guided me around all the improvements. The other interface changes seem cosmetic, but Search is a big deal.

Pinterest Search: much improved

When you type a search term into the search query box, Pinterest pops up suggestions in a slider. I typed “novel writing”. My query became tags; more tags appeared, in a slider. When you click on a tag in the slider, it’s added to the search query, to narrow your search.

For my query, the site offered these tags on the slider: process, ideas, projects, prompts, romance, and an arrow, offering even more tags.

My first thought, as it surely will be yours too, if you create content: “Oh wow! Keywords.” When you keep clicking the arrow, you get more and more keyword terms.

If you create content, Pinterest search is for you

Let’s say you have a skin care website; you’re selling products, or services. Type “skin care” into the Search query field, and here’s what you get.

Pinterest search skin care

Keep clicking the arrow, and you’ll get lots more keywords. Very nifty. It’s a content creator’s dream, especially if you’re a visually inclined marketer or writer.

With tags, you can ensure that your boards are easy to find

There’s another use for the tags/ keywords. You can see which tags come up, and edit your boards so that they’re easier to find. This can a trade-off. You may have some board titles which are witty, or creative, that you don’t want to change. That’s OK. Use the most popular tags in your pins.

I love the new Search; it will make Pinterest much easier to use, going forward. If you haven’t checked it out, go and look.
, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Blog Power: 2 More Essential Content Tips

Blog Power: 2 More Essential Content Tips

Everyone’s blogging today; if you don’t have a blog, you feel guilty. However, blogging isn’t for everyone. It takes time. Your time may well be better spent. On the other hand, if you feel that a blog would benefit your business: create one. A blog can be immensely valuable for your business, in ways you’d never expect.

Well over a year ago, I created My Top 10 Content Tips; I’ve just updated the post. Its accompanying slide deck has had over 3,600 views on SlideShare. Reading over the post, and considering the amount of content that’s produced daily, here are two more essential content tips.

1. Keep It On Your Blog!

Many companies decide that rather than blogging, they’ll devote all their resources to their Facebook or Google+ page, and send out streams of tweets. Blogging just seems too time intensive, and demanding.

That’s true. However, your blog is media that you own. Content you post on other sites is at another company’s mercy. Not to mention, it’s hard to find again. Put your content onto your blog first, then tweak it for use elsewhere.

2.  Automate Sharing, But Don’t Turn Into a Robot.

Apps like Buffer make it easy to schedule your blog post reshares, and social media messages, but don’t schedule everything. Show up on social media websites, and get social.

You’ll find many useful content tips on social media. For example, I’d never considered “plussing” my own posts and comments on Google+, but Mike Allton advises that you do:

First, within Google+, you’ll need to understand that there are three possible “Social Signals” on every post: a +1, a Comment and a Share. Every Google+ user can take any of those actions on a single post, including the original post owner. Creating the post itself does not count. But as each social signal is effected, the +1 count on any one single link included in the post goes up. To a maximum of 3 +1’s from any one unique user.

You don’t need to spend hours on social media websites, but after you automate, pop in every day or two and plus your shares, and those of others. And of course, interact. Social media networking is called that for a reason.

If you missed the previous article, read the first of the top ten blog content tips here.

 

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Super-Fast Product Creation: Buy PLR and Profit

Super-Fast Product Creation: Buy PLR and Profit

I love product creation; it’s been a mainstay of my online business since 2002. However, there are hassles. Product creation takes time, above all. You can cut down on that time dramatically when you buy PLR.

Not familiar with PLR? I’m currently offering PLR to three products which I’ve withdrawn, and explained PLR like this:

If you’re not familiar with the term, “private label rights” products, commonly referred to as “PLR”, are products to which you have extensive rights. You can put your name on the products and sell them as your own; you can add and remove text; you can split them up to make new products; you can offer them as bonuses to your own products… basically, you can treat them as your own, and use them in any way you choose.

How to Use Purchased PLR in Your Own Products.

You can use PLR products you’ve purchased in many different ways:

  • To kickstart your own product creation;
  • As social media content;
  • As bonus added-value material to your own products;
  • On membership sites;
  • In newsletters you’re sending out to customers;
  • As the basis of audio, video or presentation material you create.

I created a monthly newsletter for a UK gym company for several years, and bought health and fitness PLR extensively to repurpose in the publications. The balance of new content to PLR was around 50/ 50. The company was happy, because they got inexpensive content, and I was happy because I spent less time on the newsletter each month.

When I created a social media campaign for a marketing company, I used a lot of edited PLR in tweets, Facebook postings with images, and as fast and easy reports. When you look at PLR as raw material, it’s like baking a cake. You have the basic flour, fat and protein. By the time you’ve mixed it up and baked it, the raw material is completely transformed.

Death by PLR: Avoid It – Use PLR as Raw Material.

Once Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) became popular a few years back, Internet marketers jumped on it mindlessly. They shoveled PLR onto the Kindle bookstore. Predictably, Amazon got very cross, and swept away much PLR.

Pay close attention to what Amazon says:

Public Domain and Other Non-Exclusive Content

Some types of content, such as public domain content, may be free to use by anyone, or may be licensed for use by more than one party. We will not accept content that is freely available on the web unless you are the copyright owner of that content. For example, if you received your book content from a source that allows you and others to re-distribute it, and the content is freely available on the web, we will not accept it for sale on the Kindle store. We do accept public domain content, however we may choose to not sell a public domain book if its content is undifferentiated or barely differentiated from one or more other books.

You can use PLR as the basis of your own products. Remember what I said about using PLR as raw material, then baking it into something which looks completely different?

I don’t use PLR on Amazon; I publish content under several pen names, and ghostwrite ebooks for clients. However, if I wanted to sell an ebook on Google+ for small business for example, I’d buy good PLR and use it as raw material. Why not? It would kickstart my own thinking, and by the time I’d revised, edited and added fresh content, its own mother wouldn’t recognize it as PLR.

If you’re wary of product creation, even though you know it would benefit your business, take a fresh look at it, with the idea of judiciously using PLR in your new products. It saves time.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

3 Easy Web Content Tips: Meet Your Writing Goals

3 Easy Web Content Tips: Meet Your Writing Goals

Whether you love writing or hate it, you need to meet your goals for creating Web content. Content development may be part of your day job, or it may be your job. Either way, you need workflows to not only create content, but also to manage it.

Over the years, I’ve come to enjoy writing. That hasn’t always been so. I struggled with writing for years. Looking back, I was just scared. Fear can masquerade as procrastination, and perfectionism. I was convinced I wasn’t “good enough”. Yes, my writing sold, but I measured myself against writers I admired.

Eventually I realized that although I might want to improve my skills, I had to write anyway, so I might as well do it and enjoy it. Can you imagine a bricklayer deciding that he couldn’t do his job and build a house today because he wasn’t “good enough”?

Tip: the way you write is the way you write. As long as your writing gets the job done, you’ve succeeded. Chances are you’re better than you think you are. Look back on writing you did a year ago. You’ve improved, and you’ll continue to get better. ;-)

Let’s look at three easy Web content tips which will help you to meet your writing goals.

1. Carrot and Stick: Create Fast.

What do you do when you need to write fast, but can’t get out of your own head?

You use 750words.com. The developer says:

I’ve used the exercise as a great way to think out loud without having to worry about half-formed ideas, random tangents, private stuff, and all the other things in our heads that we often filter out before ever voicing them or writing about them. It’s a daily brain dump. Over time, I’ve found that it’s also very helpful as a tool to get thoughts going that have become stuck, or to help get to the bottom of a rotten mood.

750words.com is a way to just say yourself: “Damn the torpedoes, Full speed ahead!” – and write.

750words.com just asks you to write. It’s a carrot: write 750 words, and you’ve done it. Write or Die on the other hand, applies the stick – there are consequences if you don’t write. Several of my students report great success with Write or Die.

Currently I’m using Write or Die to help me to write romance fiction, because I’ve set myself a demanding schedule. I love Write or Die because it doesn’t care whether I want to write or not. Nor does it care that I have a headache. When it’s time to Write or Die, you just do it.

2. Manage the Content Flood: Get Organized.

I’ve often talked about Trello, and Evernote. Both apps help me to get organized and stay organized. I commend both to you.

Both apps help you to collaborate with others. Create shared notebooks in Evernote for your editorial team on a project. In Trello, create boards, and invite people to the board.

3. Plan, Plan and PLAN: Schedule Content Creation and Management.

We’ve discussed planning too. PLAN. Enough said. You can achieve much more than you think you can, as long as you plan and schedule everything.

On my WordPress blogs, I use Editorial Calendar and the Drafts Dropdown plugins to schedule content. Although Drafts Dropdown hasn’t been updated in a while, it works great.

Try these three tips. They work. You’ll create more, and better, Web content than you think you can. Happy writing. :-)

Is writing a real challenge for you?

If you’re not meeting your writing goals, consider coaching. I coach writers every day. Get in touch.  

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Content Creation With WordPress: 4 Essential Plugins

Content Creation With WordPress: 4 Essential Plugins

Is content creation wearing you down? Blogs are voracious. You need to feed the beast constantly. Luckily there are tools which can help, especially if you’re a WordPress blogger. Here are my four essential “content” plugins.

A word to the wise: add plugins one at a time, and don’t add too many. Delete any plugins you’re not using.

1. (free) Editorial Calendar: Know What You’re Publishing and When.

Editorial Calendar
It’s Friday afternoon. You’re finishing up the week’s work. Suddenly you realize… you haven’t blogged this week. There’s nothing worse than realizing you’ve got to post something to your blog within the next hour.

WordPress Editorial Calendar saves your sanity. You’ll know exactly what you’re publishing, and when – no more last-minute panics. I love that I can see my draft posts all in one place.

2. (free) WordPress SEO by Yoast: It’s a Built-in Content Checklist.

WordPress SEO by Yoast

The basics of search engine optimization (SEO) are easy enough. However, keeping them in mind when you’re fiddling around with headlines, graphics and fact checking is hard. WordPress SEO by Yoast ensures that you don’t forget optimization.

It functions as an easy checklist. You can see what a post is missing at a glance. You can even choose to hide posts and pages from the search engines, if you wish.

3. (free) Related Posts by Zemanta: the Easy Way to Add Related Posts and Images.

Related Posts
Call me shallow, but I like Related Posts by Zemanta because it makes your “related posts” look pretty. I’ve tried lots of related post plugins; Zemanta’s gets the most clickthroughs. You can see it on my Just Write a Book Blog, in the image above.

4. (free) Edit Flow: Easier Collaboration With WordPress.

Edit Flow

If you’re working on a blog with others, corralling content is frustrating, to say the least. Edit Flow makes it easy. Not only do you get a content calendar, you also get custom statuses. As content moves through the editorial process, you can change statuses with just a couple of clicks. Users can not only pitch content, but can also see which posts are in progress, and which are ready for editorial review.

So there you have it. My essential WordPress content creation plugins. If you need WordPress to do something for you, chances are that someone, somewhere has created a plugin to do it. Have fun with WordPress. :-)

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

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11 Hot Content Creation Resources To Inspire And Motivate You

Looking for content creation resources? Creating fresh content every week is demanding. It’s easy to get stale, and run out of ideas. Here are some resources you may not have considered.

Deck Transcript

Content creation is demanding. You need resources and inspiration. Let’s look at 11 resources. For more help, check out “Web Content Creator: Dominate the Web”. It’s a complete package in content creation.

1. WHAT’S NEW?

INVESTIGATE NEWS SOURCES.

Check out your favorite newspapers and magazines, online and offline. You may be able to piggyback your content onto a hot news story.

2. EXPLORE IMAGE LIBRARIES.

YOUR CREATIVE RIGHT BRAIN THINKS IN IMAGES.

Your creative right brain thinks in images. Kickstart your creativity by visiting your favorite stock image libraries, or online art galleries. Choose an image, and brainstorm content, by relating the image to your topic.

3. ASK QUESTIONS.

WHO, WHAT, WHY, WHEN AND HOW…

Questions demand answers. Write a series of “who” questions, then a series of “what” questions, and so on. You’ll soon have more content ideas than you can use.

4. BROWSE PINTEREST.

CHECK OUT THE MOST POPULAR PINS.

Press the Explore icon on Pinterest, or use the search query field. Pinterest is an amazing resource. Remember #3 – ask questions.

5. EXPLORE REDDIT AND QUORA.

DISCOVER WHAT’S HOT AND WHAT PEOPLE WANT TO KNOW.

Something’s always happening on these sites. Resist the temptation to browse: set yourself a time limit, and make lists of content ideas.

6. READ A BOOK.

EXPLORE AMAZON AND GOOGLE BOOKS.

Books are the ultimate sources. Explore your home library, your local libraries, and Amazon and Google Books.

7. WHO’S READING YOUR CONTENT?

THINK ABOUT WHAT INTERESTS THE PEOPLE WHO READ YOUR CONTENT.

We all have many interests. Think about how you could tap into social culture. What movies are people watching? What sports events are in the news? If you’ve got an opinion on a hot movie, share it.

8. TURN OLD CONTENT INTO NEW CONTENT.

UPDATE OLDER BLOG POSTS.

We tend to forget that older content is still content. Update older blog posts. If you interviewed someone a year ago, interview them again.

9. CURATE CONTENT.

YOURS, AND OTHERS’.

Hunt for great content, and share it. Explore social media sites. Don’t forget your content: add it to your content mix.

10. YOU MAY QUOTE ME.

SHARE WISDOM.

We all need a daily boost of motivation and inspiration. Share the wisdom of the wise, and inspire your audience. Quotations abound online; jot down your own favorites from your reading.

11. GOOGLE TRENDS.

WHAT’S TRENDING?

What’s hot? Google has Google Trends, which show you what people are searching for now, and what they searched for in the past. Check out trending topics on Twitter, Google+ and other networks for inspiration too.

You can view the deck at full size here.