Tag Archives: content creation

Content Bonanza: 4 Ways to Create “Instant” Content

Content Bonanza: 4 Ways to Create "Instant" Content

Everyone’s touting the benefits of “content“.  Marvelous. Just how are you supposed to find time to create content? You’re running a business, not a media company.

However… You’ve just spent your monthly marketing budget on an ad which didn’t work. Now what? The world’s changed. You used to be able to advertise and predict roughly how well you’d do, and you could set your marketing budget with confidence.

Maybe you are a media company, and you’d better find ways of creating content fast. Luckily, there are ways you can create content, almost instantly.

1. Snap a Pic, and Post It

Instagram’s hugely popular. It may be an excellent marketing venue for you. Not for me, sadly. I snap images on my phone which are interesting only to me — whiteboards in meetings, pages from my paper notebooks, and ideas for my Christmas list when I’m at the mall.

Instagram

If you’re selling stuff — anything from houses to your crafts on Easy — Instagram is a no-brainer. Be there. Snap images as you go through your day.

As you can see from the image, Goulet Pens does a great job on Instagram.

Don’t forget Pinterest. Publish your images to Pinterest too. I created a slide  deck (see below), on Pinterest tips for bloggers.

 

2. See It, Say It

Love to chat? Share your thoughts and insights on SoundCloud. Podcasts are popular, and Soundcloud gives you a simple way to get your podcast onto iTunes.

Keep your podcasts short. Skip the long chatty intro: get to the meat, and get out.

3. You May Quote Me

If you’ve said it before, say it better, in a tweet, or in an image. There are dozens of apps to turn your quotes into images, so that you can post them on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, et al.

Tip: create 20 or 30 at a time; and repost them again and again, especially on networks like Twitter, where people can easily miss a single tweet,

4. Share Great Stuff

In How to Repurpose Campaign Content for Different Channels (And Never Waste the Leftovers), Kevin Barber suggests:

You can easily curate great content from around the web and repurpose it through your channels. Write a review of a relevant book, blog about a really cool infographic, create a video covering the main points in a webinar you listened to.

When you find great stuff, share it with your audience.

Bonus Tip: Reprise Great Stuff From Your Blog

Blogging’s wonderful, but once a blog disappears into your archives, it’s out of sight, out of mind. Reprise evergreen content, and content which is relevant to your audience today.

If your blog’s been active for a few years, it’s simple to write a “this time last year” post. Extract snippets from the article, or republish as-is, with a couple of paragraphs about what’s changed, and what hasn’t.

Make Content Part of Your Marketing Funnel

Pull all the pieces of your content together for your marketing funnel — whether you consider yourself a writer or not, you need a content strategy.

, on Twitter: @angee, and find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Get coaching, and build your skills at Angela’s online store.

Writing Journal 69: Favorite Content Creation Tools

Writing Journal 69: Favorite Content Creation Tools

My writing journal for Monday, October 20, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

As usual, I started the day writing fiction. The mystery novel is still steaming along. Happy days; 2,300 words. Then nonfiction, working on the two business books: 1,800.

Next, Honey’s breakfast. Over the past few days, the weather’s been cooler, so her arthritis is bothering her. However, she’s still up for a game, and over-eats if she gets the chance.

Then, my own breakfast, while working through email. Monday tends to be a slower day for general email: just clients requesting quotes, and students sending me material. I handle most of it; Julia can deal with the quotes.

Next, it’s time to remind clients that we need images for their content. As I said in a post on Fab Freelance Writing Blog, the Web is all about images now. I’ve been looking at digital cameras; years ago, I had a photography hobby. It might be time to get back to it… when I find the time. :-)

My primary focus today is some “holiday” content for copywriting clients. We’re building up to the hot (pun intended, since it’s summer in Australia) content season. Clients suddenly realize that their website needs updating with their holiday offerings. And they need to plan and create promotional campaigns.

Time for my walk. I haven’t walked in a couple of days; I need it to clear my mind. Cold wind, so I wear my favorite beanie. :-)

Back again, and back to the holiday content. Work on that takes me up to lunch.

Lunch in front of my computer. It’s becoming a habit. However, I’ll be out most of tomorrow, so I need to get as much done as I can today. I browse through clients’ blog archives and Web content, and make notes, so that I can link the fresh holiday content back to previous content.

A reader asked about my favorite content creation tools.

My favorite content creation tools

I create a lot of content, of many different types, every day. So I tend to jump on any tool which might make creation easier. Your mileage will vary. I test and discard lots of tools, but that’s OK. Creating content consistently is a real challenge, so any tool which helps with that is a worthwhile investment.

Currently, my favorite tools include…

Evernote. Always. It’s always open, and I do a lot of writing in Evernote. It means I can write on my phone or tablet, and add ideas as they come to me.

Scrivener. Invaluable. Don’t know where I’d be without it.

Ember. (Mac) A recent acquisition. For research, as well as to check what assets have been created, and need to be created for a project.

MultiMarkdown Composer, and Ulysses (Mac.) Most of my content starts in Evernote, then makes its way to one of these programs: I use Marked as the viewer for both of them.

Marked (Mac). Wonderful for viewing and repurposing Markdown documents.

Adobe Creative Cloud. I use Photoshop and Bridge mostly.

Curio. Indispensable, both to collect assets for projects, and to keep archives of past projects. It’s amazing how often clients will return months and years later – and they’ve lost the assets we used. Curio is a huge time saver, because all the previously used assets are there, and are instantly available.

OmniOutliner (Mac.) I resisted upgrading to version 4, but finally pulled the trigger.

Inspiration. An app I adore, because you can create HUGE cluster diagrams to spark, and to reignite, creativity for a project.

Onward with the holiday content for copywriting clients

Back to developing the holiday content. Finally I’m done with the initial drafts; I send them off with relief. I’m still waiting for some product shots, so I can create product descriptions; I send a reminder to the photographer.

More emails, and phone calls to return. My daily review, and that’s it for another day.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Writing Journal 61: Sell Your Ideas

Writing Journal 61: Sell Your Ideas

My writing journal for Sunday, October 12, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

Happy Sunday — another short writing day. I manage to write another 2,300 words of the mystery novel. It’s still zooming along. No idea why… Every project hits a wall sooner or later, but this is going so well, I don’t trust it.

To stop me getting over-confident, the two nonfiction books — I’m writing them in tandem — bogged down. I managed just 350 words, and they were a struggle. I’ll need to do some brainstorming on a whiteboard. Maybe writing them together wasn’t the best idea I’ve ever had.

Breakfast for Honey, and for me, then email. I’ve still got a backlog, so luckily email was light this morning.

Last night’s coaching calls went well. I love doing them; they’re fun. I write up a call summary, and create a plan for each client. Julia will send them the material with their MP3s.

It’s time to leave for my Sunday commitments.

Sell your ideas

As you may know, I’m a writing coach. I love it, because I love writing, and enjoy helping people to overcome their challenges, whether those challenges are huge, or minor.

Although it’s easier than it’s ever been to sell your creativity, in any form— whether your creativity expresses itself in paintings, cute crafts, books, short stories, or teaching materials — it’s hard for creatives to pull the trigger, and SHIP.  As Seth Godin said:

“The only purpose of starting is to finish, and while the projects we do are never really finished, they must ship.”

I have challenges with shipping, too. I used to be the queen of procrastination. While I’m better at recognizing my own BS than I used to be, I still make excuses for not shipping. I’ve a suspicion that that’s why I like ghostwriting. I like being accountable to someone else. It means that like it or not, I need to ship.

8-Hour Wins: Create and Sell Products in Just 8 HoursTo help you to SHIP, I’ve formalized a training that I give students. It’s basically a checklist that I use for myself. I’ve tested it on students who have 1,001 perfectly reasonable (and totally BS) reasons they can’t complete projects and ship.

Here it is: 8-Hour Wins: Create and Sell Products in Just 8 Hours.

Back again: time for Sunday content and blog management

Sunday’s always my big blog management and content creation day. I review all my blogs, and clients’ blogs, and brainstorm content. I aim to have at least ten to 20 draft posts in most blogs at any one time. Although some of the drafts will be deleted, most will be written, edited, and published.

It’s October, and we’re heading into the hottest period of the year for B2C companies. They’re rolling out their pre-holiday sales. It involves dusting off their customer lists, and creating promotions for the period right through into 2015. For some the after-Christmas sales are barely over, when it’s time for the hearts and flowers of Valentine’s Day.

Keeping track of lots of blogs isn’t a picnic, especially at this time of the year. I like to get content plans for 2015 organized before November, because you can’t plan in the middle of the chaos, which defines late November to January.

So, in addition to planning content for this week and the next few weeks, I schedule in some idea-creation for clients’ 2015 content. A lot depends on how much a client is budgeting for content marketing. That means: research, reports and scopes. And proposals. I schedule those in for the next few weeks.

By the time all that’s out of the way, the day is done. Time for my daily and weekly review. Tonight, I’ll catch up on planning my new blog, and drafting some content.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Hate Pinterest’s Search? Go Look!

Hate Pinterest's Search? Go Look!

If you hated Pinterest’s Search function, go and check it out. It’s a lot better. Search now has tags. I first became aware of this when I posted a pin, and Pinterest kindly guided me around all the improvements. The other interface changes seem cosmetic, but Search is a big deal.

Pinterest Search: much improved

When you type a search term into the search query box, Pinterest pops up suggestions in a slider. I typed “novel writing”. My query became tags; more tags appeared, in a slider. When you click on a tag in the slider, it’s added to the search query, to narrow your search.

For my query, the site offered these tags on the slider: process, ideas, projects, prompts, romance, and an arrow, offering even more tags.

My first thought, as it surely will be yours too, if you create content: “Oh wow! Keywords.” When you keep clicking the arrow, you get more and more keyword terms.

If you create content, Pinterest search is for you

Let’s say you have a skin care website; you’re selling products, or services. Type “skin care” into the Search query field, and here’s what you get.

Pinterest search skin care

Keep clicking the arrow, and you’ll get lots more keywords. Very nifty. It’s a content creator’s dream, especially if you’re a visually inclined marketer or writer.

With tags, you can ensure that your boards are easy to find

There’s another use for the tags/ keywords. You can see which tags come up, and edit your boards so that they’re easier to find. This can a trade-off. You may have some board titles which are witty, or creative, that you don’t want to change. That’s OK. Use the most popular tags in your pins.

I love the new Search; it will make Pinterest much easier to use, going forward. If you haven’t checked it out, go and look.
, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.