Tag Archives: blogging

Content Creation With WordPress: 4 Essential Plugins

Content Creation With WordPress: 4 Essential Plugins

Is content creation wearing you down? Blogs are voracious. You need to feed the beast constantly. Luckily there are tools which can help, especially if you’re a WordPress blogger. Here are my four essential “content” plugins.

A word to the wise: add plugins one at a time, and don’t add too many. Delete any plugins you’re not using.

1. (free) Editorial Calendar: Know What You’re Publishing and When.

Editorial Calendar
It’s Friday afternoon. You’re finishing up the week’s work. Suddenly you realize… you haven’t blogged this week. There’s nothing worse than realizing you’ve got to post something to your blog within the next hour.

WordPress Editorial Calendar saves your sanity. You’ll know exactly what you’re publishing, and when – no more last-minute panics. I love that I can see my draft posts all in one place.

2. (free) WordPress SEO by Yoast: It’s a Built-in Content Checklist.

WordPress SEO by Yoast

The basics of search engine optimization (SEO) are easy enough. However, keeping them in mind when you’re fiddling around with headlines, graphics and fact checking is hard. WordPress SEO by Yoast ensures that you don’t forget optimization.

It functions as an easy checklist. You can see what a post is missing at a glance. You can even choose to hide posts and pages from the search engines, if you wish.

3. (free) Related Posts by Zemanta: the Easy Way to Add Related Posts and Images.

Related Posts
Call me shallow, but I like Related Posts by Zemanta because it makes your “related posts” look pretty. I’ve tried lots of related post plugins; Zemanta’s gets the most clickthroughs. You can see it on my Just Write a Book Blog, in the image above.

4. (free) Edit Flow: Easier Collaboration With WordPress.

Edit Flow

If you’re working on a blog with others, corralling content is frustrating, to say the least. Edit Flow makes it easy. Not only do you get a content calendar, you also get custom statuses. As content moves through the editorial process, you can change statuses with just a couple of clicks. Users can not only pitch content, but can also see which posts are in progress, and which are ready for editorial review.

So there you have it. My essential WordPress content creation plugins. If you need WordPress to do something for you, chances are that someone, somewhere has created a plugin to do it. Have fun with WordPress. :-)

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Buy this on Selz Start selling on Selz

My 5 Best Blogging Tips After 15 Years of Instant Publishing

My 5 Best Blogging Tips After 15 Years of Instant Publishing

Everyone has blogging tips. After 15 years, so do I. I’m even more enthusiastic about blogging now than I was in the beginning. Truth to tell, when I started out as a blogger, I had no idea what I thought I was doing.

Other writers had opinions. The popular opinion was that I was a few sandwiches short of a picnic. “Write for free?!” Shock, horror and disbelief abounded. Yes, the generally derisive attitude towards blogging in those days was disturbing, but I wasn’t defensive. So blogging was weird; so what? I adored instant publishing then, as I do now. The idea that I could write something, and garner potentially millions of readers as soon as I hit Publish, thrills me.

Here’s what I’ve learned — in five blogging tips.  If you like, it’s what I wish I knew a decade and a half ago.

1. Be Yourself. You Can’t Be Anyone Else, and It’s Exhausting to Try.

You’re blogging for a reason – to promote your business, or a product, or a cause. (If you’re blogging for self-expression, you don’t need these tips. Let yourself go, and blog.)

Make a list of your goals. Most blog posts will include a Call to Action (CTA) to enable you to meet your goals. Beyond that, be yourself. The more you blog, the more traffic you will get.

Bloggers worry about how often then should blog. Mike Allton has the ultimate answer:

In order to finally answer this question, a business owner must first decide how much more traffic and leads they want. Using the data above, a business can look at what they’re getting from their website now, how much they want to improve, and quickly determine where they need to be with their blog campaign.

Blog as often as you can, and do the best you can on each blog post. Write the way you speak. Beyond that, don’t worry about it. I’ve written throw-away posts in 15 minutes which struck a nerve and got lots of responses. I’ve also slaved over blog posts which no one ever cared about – at least as far as I can tell.

2. Write Every Day. Some of That Writing Will Auto-Magically Turn Into Blog Posts.

I write every day. In my early years as a writer, I struggled with writing. Endlessly. I waited for inspiration… and waited. I waited to write books I wanted to write until I was a “better writer.” Finally, I gave up worrying about things I couldn’t control and wrote. I developed the writing habit, and a writing process which works for me, and my students.

If you say to yourself: “I’ll blog every day”, you’ll freeze. Just commit to writing something every day. Some of those snippets of writing will turn into blog posts. Use Evernote or OneNote to store your snippets. Then scan your snippets to see if they trigger anything when it’s time to write a blog post.

Create an editorial calendar, but don’t sweat it.

3. It’s Your Blog. Say What You Like (Be Kind!) Remember That You’re Responsible for Everything on Your Blog.

Some bloggers troll and write link bait. If that kind of thing appeals to you, ask yourself why. No, this isn’t a moral issue. To each his own. However, over the years I’ve come to appreciate Elwood P. Dowd’s philosophy:

Years ago my mother used to say to me, she’d say, “In this world, Elwood, you must be” – she always called me Elwood – “In this world, Elwood, you must be oh so smart or oh so pleasant.” Well, for years I was smart. I recommend pleasant. You may quote me.

(If you haven’t watched the movie Harvey, go and watch it. James Stewart is wonderful in it.)

I recommend pleasant over smart, too. Be nice. You need other people, in this social media world. If you make trolling a habit, you’ll not only put off readers, you’ll alienate other bloggers.

4. Trust Yourself. If You Think It’s Important, It Is.

Trust yourself and your blogging. In 1999, I read blogs, and wanted to blog, but I couldn’t think of a reason. At the time, I was writing business books for Prentice Hall, taking care of my copywriting clients, and writing for magazines too. I was a busy writer. Why on earth would I want to take on unpaid writing?

Although I tried to talk myself out of it (others did too), I started a blog. I can’t remember what it was about. Nor do I remember the platform. Then I started a blog for a weekly ezine I wrote for creatives, Creative Small Biz. I liked it, and the ezine got subscribers via the blog. More blogging and blogs followed.

You don’t need anyone’s permission to blog, not even your own. If you’re inspired, blog. :-)

5. Be Interested. Enthusiasm Will Get You Everywhere You Want to Go.

Follow your passions. Yes, you’re blogging for a reason: to promote your business or whatever. You’ve got plenty of leeway inside your basic parameters. You can include your private life in your blog, or not, it’s up to you. As long as “cat” (irrelevant) posts don’t take over your blog, you can blog about anything you choose.

Of course, if you’re a lifestyle, or “mommy” blogger, you’ll blog about your insights with your life as your source material.

Whatever you choose to blog about, be passionate, and stay enthusiastic. Your enthusiasm will make blogging easy.

So, there you have it. My best tips after 15 years of blogging. Have fun with your blogging.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Not in the Mood: 3 Blogging Tips To Get Over Bloggers’ Procrastination

Not in the Mood: 3 Blogging Tips Get Over Bloggers’ Procrastination

Not in the mood to write a blog post? Although I love blogging, half the time I’d rather be reading – or doing something else undemanding. If you allow it, procrastination can kill your blog. For hobbyist bloggers, that’s okay. It’s not okay if your job or your livelihood depends on writing more content.

Check out these three blogging tips for those times you’re just not in the mood.

1. Get Inspired by Google Suggest – Tip Toe Through the Alphabet.

Google’s the savior of recalcitrant bloggers. Hie yourself off to Google, and enter a topic – any topic. Add the letter “a.”

google suggest

As you can see in the image above, I entered “blogging”, plus “a.” I haven’t anything to say on blogging away debt, but I could create a post on any of the other three ideas, even if I wasn’t in a blogging mood.

2. Write a List of Words. Use Them in Your Blog Post.

Challenge yourself. Write a list of words – any words. Author Ray Bradbury used nouns:

These lists were the provocations, finally, that caused my better stuff to surface. I was feeling my way toward something honest, hidden under the trapdoor on the top of my skull.

You can use any words you like. Example: summer, drizzle, sly, sky blue, river, petunia… Now write a blog post, and include those words. Or not, your choice.

Writing a list of words primes the pump. You’ve given the logical side of your brain something to think about. Before you know it, the creative side of your brain gets in on the act, and you’ve written a blog post.

This exercise works well if you need to create your editorial calendar for the month.

3. Temper, Temper – Think About Something That Annoys You.

Got a temper? Me too. I’ve calmed down over the years, but I can create a list of annoyances which get me into a temper without any effort.

Think of something which annoys you. No, don’t blog about that. Use the energy and make a word list. Anger is just energy, and you can direct it anywhere you like. Direct that anger into creating a blog post. Tip: keep your post positive.

So there you have it. Next time you’re not in the mood, try one of these blogging tips. They’re fun.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

photo credit: TheAlieness GiselaGiardino²³ via photopin cc

Book Marketing: 5 Easy Ways to Blog Your Book

book marketing

You’ve written a book. Now it’s time for some simple book marketing magic. Why not blog your book? Not only is blogging a free promotional method, it’s also a way of building your readership for your next book.

I started my first blog a decade and a half ago, and have always used blogs for book marketing. Indeed, looking back, I’ve rarely bothered with other promotional methods. To me, blogs are instant publishing. I love the idea that I can type something, and within minutes, potentially millions of people could read my words.

Blogs’ are the lazy person’s book marketing. My thrill comes from writing. Once a book’s done, I tend to lose interest. Blogging’s writing, so it keeps me interested in a book.

Hate Writing? Book Marketing With Blogs Isn’t for You

You can create video and audio blog posts if you hate writing, but those options involve writing too, so if you’re all written-out once you’ve completed your book, blogging isn’t the right promotional method for you.

Assuming however that while writing may not be the joy of your life, you don’t actively hate it, let’s look at five easy ways to blog your book.

1. Start Early. Blog While You’re Writing Your Book.

Don’t wait until your book’s done before you create a blog. You’re missing out on creating interest before your book’s publication. Build your mailing list now. (More on your mailing list shortly.)

Tell your readers about your upcoming book; as much as you’re comfortable revealing.

2. Blog for Your Readers: What Do They Care About?

You want to market your book. However, droning on and on about your book won’t win you much of a readership. Moreover, you’re using energy which needs to go into your book.

You’re blogging for your book’s audience. Who are they? What do they care about? Think about your ideal reader, and write for him, or her.

Let’s say you’re writing a romance novel. Romance readers come from all walks of life. You’ve got a million and one things you could blog about, from the area in which your book is set, to recipes. Blog about your interests. Review others’ books in the same genre, or any book you find fascinating. Make it plain you’re a romance novelist, and share your book’s publication date.

The author of the Historical Fiction Research blog shares fascinating historical snippets with readers.

Jane Austen’s World is a wonderful blog about all things Jane. I became aware of the blog via the blog’s Pinterest boards. With 173 boards, over 62,000 pins, and over 48,000 followers, the blog and Pinterest work brilliantly together.

pinterest

Take a tip from Jane Austen’s World; if you don’t already have a Pinterest account, create one. Then pin, pin, pin… and pin some more.

3. Consider WIIFM – “What’s in It for Me?”

Millions of blog posts are published each day. Blogging’s fine, as a hobby. However, you’re using a blog for book marketing, so you need to be aware not only of your book’s potential readers, but also what might turn them into book buyers.

Consider what’s in it for them. “WIIFM” – what’s in it for me? is a copywriter’s acronym; people read what they read for a reason. Give them a reason. Think about what appeals to your readers.

You can take cues from other authors’ blogs, but don’t fall into the “me too” trap. Be authentic. Write what your perceive your readers care about, as long as you care about it too.

Consider popular books such as the “50 Shades” trilogy. The trilogy’s made millions for its author. It started out as fan fiction for the Twilight books, and was hugely popular. Twilight fans wanted more, and EL James gave it to them.

I can’t speak to either the 50 Shades or Twilight series, since I haven’t read them. However, the WIIFM aspect intrigues me. Probably unconsciously, both Stephenie Meyer and EL James tapped into a deep and profitable vein in public consciousness.

4. Create a Mailing List: It’s the Reason You Blog.

Someone comes to your blog, reads a post, and clicks away. With so much content online, the chance that he or she will return are slim. You can increase the likelihood that someone will return to your blog by creating a mailing list. Your mailing list is key to building your readership. Make creating a list a priority.

5. Forget “Musts.” Do What You Like. It’s Your Book, and Your Blog.

Few things infuriate me more than editors, or literary agents, or anyone else, telling an author how to blog. It’s your blog; do what you like. Over the years, I’ve had many people telling me how I should blog. I’ve thanked them kindly, and gone my own way.

Up until 2005, selling anything on a blog was frowned on. Anyone bringing crass commercialism into blogging was not only a horrible blogger, their morals were suspect too.

Eventually, I got a wry chuckle out of the “you can’t do that!” anti-commercialism crowd. After 2005, they gave in, and jumped into making money from their blogs. Mind you, I was tempted to ask them what had happened to their “pure blogging” stance, but I resisted the temptation.

Be you. It’s your book, and your blog. There are no rules. Moreover, just because something works today, doesn’t mean it will work tomorrow. Please understand, I’m not talking about fundamentals like book marketing and blogging, they work. I’m talking about tricks and strategies which come and go.

Amazon’s KDP Select is an example. It works for many authors, but not as the tsunami of cash it once was, for some authors. “Free” works today, as it always will. But don’t base your book marketing on one trick, like “free” and expect it to work forever. Write the best book you can. Use KDP Select, or Google Play, or whatever, AND build a real blog. Put your heart into your blog, as you put it into your book, and book marketing via blogging will work for you.

Want to write and sell ebooks?

8 hour ebooks

 

This 2nd Edition of our bestselling ebook program is completely revised and updated with new material – more insights and fresh strategies so that you can start writing and selling ebooks FAST.

, and on Twitter: @angee

Create A Blog The Minimalist Way (For Blogging Haters)

Angela Booth Roon blog

My new blog on Roon… I couldn’t resist it…

 

You hate blogging, but you want to create a blog. These days, you can blog anywhere. Quora lets you create a blog, and you can create a faux blog on Google+. Many other sites encourage you to blog with them. But what if you want to create a blog on something you own, rather than on a social network?

While doing some research for a project on Markdown, the so-easy-it’s-a-joy text-to-HTML conversion tool, I came across some simple options for creating your own blog, completely for free, simply and easily.

Not a Markdown aficionado? If you’re not familiar with Markdown, relax. A Markdown document is just a text file with Markdown syntax; saved with either .md or .markdown file extension. It takes a minute or two to learn Markdown syntax, and hey presto – your writing life got a lot easier. As Brett Terpstra says in his two minute explanation, Markdown fits in any workflow.

Let’s look at three ways you can create a blog you love the minimalist’s way.

1. Try Calepin, if you’re a Dropbox user.

Calepin
If you’re a Dropbox user, great choice, Calepin is for you. Read the Calepin page, and you’ll find a link to this example of a Calepin blog.

Jon Mitchell’s written a paean to Calepin in a little tutorial.

2. Got a website already? Dropplets offers free no-hassle blogging.

Dropplets

If you’ve got a website already, Dropplets gives you a simple, no-hassle totally free way to blog. You just upload the contents of the Dropplets ZIP file to your server. Open your new website in a browser, and follow the prompts.

Then you simply create your blog posts in a plain text file, using Markdown, then upload it to your server using the Dropplets uploader.

Here’s a demo of a Dropplets site. Dropplets comes with a free template, and you can buy a premium template from the Dropplets marketplace.

3. Roon: just gorgeous. Easy, and free.

Roon

I hit the Roon website, and couldn’t resist creating a blog. As if I didn’t have enough blogs already. Never mind. My Roon blog will fit into my life somewhere. Here’s my Roon blog.

Roon creates gorgeous blogs, as many as you like, for free. You can buy add-ons like your own domain name, and an analytics package, for a small charge.

Let’s see what Roon looks like in action, in the image below. Here’s the backend of Roon. It’s simple, and gives you lots of space to write, right in your Web browser. Click around the various areas, it takes just a minute and you’ll see how everything works.

Roon backend

Ready to publish? Hit the Publish link on the top right, and you’re done. Here’s my first published post on Roon. Blindingly simple to create. Write, upload an image if you wish, and you’re done.

In the backend, you’ll see your published and draft posts in the left sidebar.

If you want to create a blog, but can’t face the hassle of either creating a blog, spending hours choosing a theme, and then the endless updating, let alone writing blog posts, you need a minimalist option. Choose one of the three options above. (And if you’re already a blogger, be wary of Roon — or you’ll be the proud parent of another blog before you know it.)

, and on Twitter: @angee

Marketing Strategies For 2014: Tearless and Fearless (4 Tips)

marketingstrategy2014

Wondering about your marketing strategies for 2014? Many small businesses earnestly create marketing plans, but our strategies last as long as New Year’s resolutions.

Invariably, Murphy’s Law applies. We want to try the latest big new thing (content marketing, perhaps) but whatever we try turns out to be more complicated than we expect. Or it needs more resources that we have. So we pull back and focus whatever’s familiar, even if it’s expensive, and no longer works as well as it once did.

Let’s look at four tearless and fearless marketing strategies. Tearless because they’re free. They just take time. Fearless because they’re easy.

1. Do more of whatever worked for you in 2013.

What worked for you in 2013? If you’ve got an ad that’s been running in your local paper for three years, keep it up. Your customers are used to your ad. They expect to see you there. However, consider experimenting a little. Could you run special offerings for new customers?

If you’re using Twitter to manage customer service, keep doing that. Consider creating a Twitter-specific page on your website to welcome new customers, and tell them who you are.

2. Get found online: blog.

Does your business need a blog? Probably, if only because it will:

Improve search engine rankings – The more content you produce, the more likely you will be found by your prospects when they are researching your industry online. As long as you have a content marketing strategy in place, optimizing for specific long-tail keywords, you should see a significant increase in search engines rankings.

Here’s the easiest and laziest way to answer the “blog or not?” question. Check your competitors’ websites. If they’re blogging, your customers will expect you to do the same.

If you hate writing, post images of your products, your customers, or your town. Blog whatever YOU like. Treat your blog and your Twitter account as your customer service department: help your customers, and your prospective customers, and you can’t go wrong.

3. Forget about the “shares.” Think: “conversions”.

If you’re using social media marketing, Search Engine Journal offered this advice in content marketing trends for 2014:

The main thing that we expect to see in the New Year is for marketers to shy away from the cheap, clickbait content that inflates “vanity metrics,” and move more towards creating niche-specific, high quality content that provides value to their followers.

When you provide valuable content, your visitors will stay on your website longer. This gives you more opportunities for conversions (sales.)

4. The Web means Google and that means Google+.

If you’ve ignored Google+, revisit the network.

As Brett Nuckles suggests:

Getting on Google+ will help Google’s Web crawlers index your site, leading to higher placement during a Web search. It will also ensure that customers get the right information when they search for your business on Google.

2013 has been a big year on Google+; the network is becoming more useful by the month. Google’s sinking money into it. Studies suggest that Google+ has over 500 million users, and that almost 70 per cent of marketers want to learn more about the network.

What marketing strategies are you thinking about for 2014? For me, the mix is much as before. I’ll be blogging, and will remain active on social media. Wherever you are in the world, I wish you much success in 2014. :-)

write a book book coaching

, and on Twitter: @angee

Blogging Tips: 5 Easy Tips To Simplify Your Business Blogging in 2014

Blogging Tips: 5 Easy Tips To Simplify Your Business Blogging in 2014

Love blogging or hate it, it we’re all looking for tips which will simplify our blogging. Although I’m in the “love” camp, I have lots of other writing I need to do, so I look for shortcuts.

Here are my top tips to help you to blog more effectively in 2014, so that you can turn your blog into a powerful marketing tool for your business.

1. Before you start writing, decide what you’re selling.

We discussed thinking about conversions, rather than traffic. Ideally, each blog post you create will have a call to action. If you ask your visitors to do something, some will.

Way back in 2004, when blogging started becoming mainstream, commercial blogging was frowned on. A little of that “content for content’s sake” mindset remains. You don’t need to blog with a “buy this!” mindset, but you do need to include a call to action.

Tip: each month, look through your list of posts, and edit your calls to action. Your business and marketing goals change over time. Update your blog posts to reflect this.

2. Batch-create, always.

If you’re creating a blog post, you might as well create two. Or more. Here’s the key to batch-creation: always have blog posts in draft form.

This simplifies business blogging, because your brain hates unfinished tasks:

After starting a task, your brain will be more enticed to finish it to its “conclusion.” You also tend to see that it’s not as big a mountain as you initially imagined, and that the work involved in completing this task won’t be so terrifying after all.

Here’s how this works. Let’s say you’re writing a blog post. Create a list of keywords for the posts, as you usually do. Then in addition to the article you’re writing, begin another couple of articles.

As the old saying goes, “well begun is half done”. Just writing working titles, and a couple of sentences for each draft, helps you to conquer procrastination.

Add the drafts to your editorial calendar. You’ll be amazed at how quickly you complete the posts you’ve started.

3. Before you create, decide how you’ll get more value from each blog post.

You can get more value from a blog post by: using it in a short report or ebook, creating a podcast or video from it, or by using it in your company newsletter.

4. Write fast, edit at leisure.

Writing and editing are two separate mental processes. If you try to combine these two processes, you’ll get frustrated, and will decide you hate blogging.

Batch-creating comes into play again. Give yourself 20 minutes to write a quick draft. Use a timer. I like Repeat Timer Pro. Then spend ten minutes adding content to a couple of your draft posts.

You can edit your posts another day, or later in the same day. I always say that professional writers expect to write cr*p, because they know they can improve on what they’ve written. You write to discover what you think. Just get something written, and let your subconscious mind do the grunt work.

5. Get out of your office: use your camera.

Your cell phone camera is an amazing blogging tool, so get out of your office, and wander around, snapping some photos.

It doesn’t matter much what you photograph. Your photos act as triggers to your inspiration. You can use them on your blog, or not, it’s up to you, but if you frequently find yourself thinking: “I don’t know what to blog about”, take photos. Your images will inspire you.

Try these simple blogging tips. They work. You may discover that you love blogging too. :-)

write a book book coaching

 

, and on Twitter: @angee

Blog Marketing: 4 Tips to Build a Hard-Working Blog in 2014

Blog Marketing: 4 Tips to Build a Hard-Working Blog in 2014

Want your blog to work harder in 2014? It’s easy to fall into a rut, producing similar types of content. Rethink your blog marketing. Challenge yourself to keep your blog fresh, for yourself and your visitors.

According to Worldometers, three million blog posts were published today, so there’s a lot of competition for your blog. Your challenge in 2014 is not only to get more targeted visitors to your blog, but also to ensure that your blog helps you to meet your marketing goals.

Let’s look at four tips which will help you to  make your blog work harder, and achieve your blog marketing goals.

1. Maximize the return on your investment: make your content work harder.

Creating blog content takes time and energy. Repurposing makes your blog work harder.

Arnie Kuenn of CMI suggests thinking about repurposing from the start:

Creating a repurposing plan at the beginning of your content marketing strategy development will help you brainstorm and produce content efficiently, while keeping your repurposing process streamlined and in alignment with your other great content efforts.

You can use the information you’ve collected for a blog post and create a video, or a presentation. In addition, you can use snippets and images from the content on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

Vital: before you create content to repurpose, make a note of your goals for the content.

2. Collaborate: reach out to others.

Every blog needs more and better traffic. When you reach out to others, you can build connections which will increase your traffic. Make a list of connections: your business colleagues, other bloggers in your niche, and your suppliers.

Buzzstream is an excellent tool for outreach. If you’ve been trying to build relationships, you know there’s a lot to track. You need stronger tools than email and spreadsheets.

3. Stay in touch: build your mailing list.

When someone reaches your blog, give them a chance to get more from you. A mailing list is an essential tool. Most mailing list providers (aweber, for example) will send your latest blog posts to subscribers via email.

Your mailing list increases your conversions without effort.

4. Mine the gold in your archives: keep content relevant.

If your blog is new, you won’t yet have archives. On the other hand, if you’ve been blogging for years, you’ve got great material which your visitors may never see.

Reviving an older post takes just a few minutes. If the content’s up to date, just change the call to action. If it needs to be brought up to date, it may take a few minutes longer. You can repurpose older content too. Use snippets in social media postings, or turn the content into video or use it in a podcast.

Bonus tip: integrate your blog and website.

On some company websites, the blog’s shunted off to the side, like a red-headed stepchild. To make your blog work harder, make it part of your website. If you’re launching a new product for example, add those blog links which discuss the product.

So there you have it: blog marketing tips to build a hard-working blog in 2014. If you put them into action, your blog will add to your bottom line.

Need help with blog marketing for 2014? Contact me.

, and on Twitter: @angee