Ebook Promotion: How To Blog Your Novel

Ebook Promotion: How To Blog Your Novel

We’ve been talking about ebook promotion this week. It’s a popular topic, and I’ve had questions.

Several readers asked about how to blog your novel. Another reader put his current novel on the backburner for now, and doesn’t know how to tell his blog readers that he’s started a new novel.

Let’s look at blog topics for novelists first.

You’re using a blog to promote your novels: what can you write about?

The short answer: anything you like. :-) The only proviso is — try not to give spoilers.

A lot depends on your genre. Some genres lend themselves easily to blog promotions.

Historical and historical romance novelists have it easy. They can share fascinating info from their research on their blogs. Two Nerdy History Girls do it well.

English novelist Kate Mosse blogged her novel Labyrinth; here’s one of her posts from 2003. She shows that blogging your novels works. I read her blog at the time, and bought Labyrinth when it was released. The novel became a huge bestseller. In 2003, there weren’t as many novelists blogging as there are today. I’m sure that Kate’s blog helped Labyrinth’s success.

Julian Stockwin writes wonderful historical novels set in the Georgian period, the Thomas Kydd series. I’ve been receiving his monthly newsletter for years. I just checked, and sure enough, he has a blog, which covers his research travels, the background to his books, and much more.

Suspense novelist Alexandra Sokoloff blogs about writing and her books.

To repeat: you can blog about anything you like. It’s your blog. Blog about your family, your hobbies — whatever. Just remember to mention what you’re working on, and when your next novel will be released.

(Get readers to sign up to your mailing list, too.)

Everyone’s different. Follow your intuition. Blog about whatever is fun for you to talk about.

You’re blogging your novel: how do you tell readers you’re setting that novel aside for now?

You don’t need to tell readers anything. Just start blogging about your new novel.

Important tip: stay positive. Some authors blog about their writing challenges. It’s a mistake. We’ve all got problems. Your blog’s a promotional tool. No one needs to know that you’re sick of your characters and want to kick them off a tall cliff. If you’re sick of your current novel, and are starting a new one, just start blogging about your new novel.

Just start blogging: you’ll find stuff to talk about, I promise

You’re writing a novel. That’s exciting. Get your blog’s readers excited about your novel, and you’ll have readers who are eager to buy it on the day you upload it to Amazon.

Ebook Dominance: sell more copies of your ebooks, every day

Ebook Dominance: Market and SELL Your Ebooks In Just 15 Minutes A Day

Discover the marketing secrets of bestselling authors — you can market in minutes, from the comfort of your sofa…

How would you feel if your sales doubled, then tripled — and then YOU hit the Kindle hot sellers’ lists?

Ebook Dominance helps you to turbocharge your marketing, and sell more ebooks today.

, on Twitter: @angee, and find Angela on Pinterest, too.

How to profit from your writing: online store.

Sponsored Content: Ads That Get Read

If you’re not doing content marketing yet, you’re thinking about it. This study reports that 86% of North American B2B businesses are using content marketing in 2015. Sponsored content, also called “native advertising” is a form of content advertising.

In a sense it’s the successor to old-style magazine advertorials. But where advertorials — I’ve written more than a few in my time — plugged the advertiser’s product, sponsored content doesn’t. It’s going for the click, and aims to look innocuous, to blend in to its surroundings. That’s where the “native” comes in. It’s advertising designed not to look like advertising.

Let’s look at an example, clipped from News.com.au.

Sponsored content appears on News.com.au as it does on many news sites; in this instance, it’s called “News From Around the Web”.

Sponsored content is all about the headline, and history junkie that I am, I couldn’t resist a click on the Titanic mystery article, sponsored by Ancestry, via Outbrain. The article’s 400 words, and it’s an article, rather than an ad. The only clue you get that it’s advertising is the website on which it appears, and the final sentence.

Sponsored content’s replacing banner advertising

With straight banner advertising dead, sponsored content is its replacement. Unfortunately, as Mashable points out, marketers lose the plot. They get hypnotized by clicks, and a lot of sponsored content is just click-bait. Where’s the return on investment?

Making sense of sponsored content

Sponsored content can be hugely valuable. Your content appears on a heavily-trafficked website, and you’ll get clicks. However, there are challenges, because this is a new area of advertising.

Inc.com reports:

“Sponsored content represents a burgeoning opportunity for brands to connect with consumers in the comfort of their most trusted environments–the publications they go to for information and entertainment. Yet, as a relatively new form of advertising, the realm of sponsored content is largely unexplored and unknown. This will be the year that brands come to know sponsored content intimately–and embrace it wholeheartedly.”

Yes, sponsored content is a growing opportunity. If you’re using content marketing, sponsored content is your next step. It’s advertising, but it’s ads that get read.

Want more info? Contact me if you’re wondering whether sponsored content could enhance your marketing this year.

 

, on Twitter: @angee, and find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Get coaching, and build your skills at Angela’s online store.

Pitch Ideas: A Time-Saving Template

Pitch Ideas: A Time-Saving Template

Need to pitch ideas? Pitcherific is very clever. It offers a simple, free pitch template you can use, right in your Web browser. And, to ensure that you’re not taking too much time on it, there’s a timer too.

What’s a pitch?

A pitch is a sales tool. It’s a presentation. It can be as short as an elevator pitch, which takes a minute or two, or it can be a huge, glitzy presentation.

I like Pitcherific’s tool, because it outlines the basic elements of a pitch: your hook, the problem faced by your audience, your solution, and the “close”, which you should think of as the “call to action.”

When should you pitch?

The short answer: do it more. I work with writers and marketers, and very few (think one in a thousand) do enough pitches. I include myself in the group too. We know that we should pitch more, but we just don’t.

An example. I was browsing the Web, researching a project, and came across a company which sells popular products. This company has been in business for a couple of decades. I thought, “wow, this company would do well in Australia.” Then I went on with what I was doing.

An hour later, I remembered the company. I went back through my browser history so that I could find their name, and send them a pitch email. Your pitch doesn’t need to be complicated. It can be a simple email message, or it can be a complete presentation.

Give Pitcherific a try. Disclosure: I have no connection with the company, at all. I just think their template is very useful. Pitcherific will help you not only to create pitches quickly, it will also give you confidence.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Clever: Create a Fast and Easy “About me” Haiku Deck Presentation

Clever: Create a Fast and Easy “About me” Haiku Deck Presentation

I’m a huge fan of Haiku Deck, the presentation app which used to be available only on the iPad, but is now available for the Web too.

Yesterday I was browsing Pinterest, and came across a board of “About Me” Haiku Decks. What a clever idea! You can create a deck like this in minutes, to inspire yourself, and others.

I especially enjoyed Stephanie S. Bell’s deck. She’s used a wonderful mix of images, and just enough text.

Explore decks, and then create your own. You can pin your deck, and embed it on your website or blog too.

If you wish, you can post your deck to Slideshare with just a couple of clicks:

Type in your SlideShare username and password, click “SHARE,” and a PDF of your deck will be automatically uploaded to your Slideshare profile.

You can then click through to your deck on SlideShare to add a description, tags, and category, all of which help your great ideas get discovered.

Energize your blog’s archive with short presentations

Yesterday, we discussed energizing your blog’s content:

Energize your blog’s content by updating it regularly. Add “Update my blog!” to your calendar program. Then, once a week, or once a month, update a blog post or two. It’s amazing how easily your content can become slightly out of date.

Why not summarize a blog post’s information with a slide deck, and embed the deck on the post? You’ll be drawing attention to valuable content on your blog.

Have fun creating decks; I’ll be creating my own About Me deck.

If you create an About Me deck, please post a link to your deck in the Comments. I’d love to see what you create and get to know you. :-)
, and on Twitter: @angee