All posts by Angela Booth

About Angela Booth

Copywriter Angela Booth's clients tell her she performs "word magic." Whether she's writing advertising materials, Web content, or ghostwriting for her clients, she's committed to helping them to achieve results, fast. Author of one of the first books about online business, Making The Internet Work For Your Business, Angela's written many business books which have been published by major publishers. She's an enthusiastic self-publisher and writing teacher.

Writing Journal 41: Fiction and Ghostwriting

Writing Journal 41: Fiction and Ghostwriting

My writing journal for Monday, September 22, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

The novella’s coming right along. Just two more major scenes to do, and I’m done with the first draft. I managed 2,300 words this morning but only because I skipped a scene I wasn’t ready to write. I inserted this scene in the outline a couple of days ago. It needs setting up in previous scenes, so I’ve decided to do the editing first.

After I’ve slotted in the foreshadowing elements, I can write the scene.

With that done, I started the nonfiction book proposal for a client’s memoir.

Email’s light this morning, which is excellent. I managed to get through some of the backlog last night. I’ll do the rest tonight, and then I should be all caught up.

Honey’s breakfast, and my own, while I continue with the company history I’m ghostwriting. I meant to get to it on the weekend, but didn’t. I manage another 1,800 words. I need to clarify some info, so I send the client an email message with the questions.

Next, it’s time for my walk. I’ve got a lingering headache this morning. No idea why. With any luck, the fresh air should get rid of it.

Lots of birds around this morning; lorikeets and the ever-present Indian mynahs. And crows, of course. Several crows have staked out a defined territory, and they protect it from other birds. Next to “crow territory” is magpie territory. The magpies are nesting, so I keep a wary eye out for them. They can be aggressive.

Next, copywriting the company history book

I’m a little behind with this, so I created some cluster diagrams to clarify my thinking. They’re very useful at all stages of the writing process.

I keep going past our normal lunch break. I’ve got a meeting this afternoon, so I’ll have lunch out, and then attend the meeting.

Rebranding, and launching a blog

It’s mid-afternoon. The meeting went well. The company’s rebranding itself, and wants to launch a blog to represent their brand. They’d like me to create a proposal and a scope. I need to do some research, first. I tentatively slot that project in for later this week; I might not get to it until next week, however.

I write myself a long note in Evernote, and reference it in the bullet journal.

I’ve got some phone calls to return; I need to get to that before everyone leaves work.

Although I’ve got five items left on my bullet journal task list, I decide to call it a day. Those tasks will need to wait until tomorrow, or later in the week. I’ve got a commitment tonight. So I do my daily review, and total my word counts — and that’s it for the day.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Pitch Ideas: A Time-Saving Template

Pitch Ideas: A Time-Saving Template

Need to pitch ideas? Pitcherific is very clever. It offers a simple, free pitch template you can use, right in your Web browser. And, to ensure that you’re not taking too much time on it, there’s a timer too.

What’s a pitch?

A pitch is a sales tool. It’s a presentation. It can be as short as an elevator pitch, which takes a minute or two, or it can be a huge, glitzy presentation.

I like Pitcherific’s tool, because it outlines the basic elements of a pitch: your hook, the problem faced by your audience, your solution, and the “close”, which you should think of as the “call to action.”

When should you pitch?

The short answer: do it more. I work with writers and marketers, and very few (think one in a thousand) do enough pitches. I include myself in the group too. We know that we should pitch more, but we just don’t.

An example. I was browsing the Web, researching a project, and came across a company which sells popular products. This company has been in business for a couple of decades. I thought, “wow, this company would do well in Australia.” Then I went on with what I was doing.

An hour later, I remembered the company. I went back through my browser history so that I could find their name, and send them a pitch email. Your pitch doesn’t need to be complicated. It can be a simple email message, or it can be a complete presentation.

Give Pitcherific a try. Disclosure: I have no connection with the company, at all. I just think their template is very useful. Pitcherific will help you not only to create pitches quickly, it will also give you confidence.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Writing Journal 40: Use PLR For Fast Ebooks

Writing Journal 40: Use PLR For Fast  Ebooks

My writing journal for Sunday, September 21, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

It’s Sunday, which means that it will be another short writing day. As usual, I started the day off writing fiction, and managed 1,400 words. It’s going slowly this morning. Sometimes the writing flows as slowly as molasses in winter. It’s aggravating. I hate it, because I’m usually a fast writer; I can focus and get it done. Of course, annoyance just makes it harder to focus. :-)

Next, I do a little more on the client’s book proposal for a memoir. I need to be ready to start writing it tomorrow morning.

The time zooms past when you’ve got a lot to do. I make Honey’s breakfast, and eat my own while reading email. I’ve got to catch up with client emails, and student emails, tonight. No time today.

I posted an article to my freelance writing blog about a PLR offering. Several students have asked me whether I’d sell PLR to some of my programs which we’re withdrawing. The answer’s simple — sure, if you want it. I won’t be using the material myself, so I’m more than happy for others to get value from it.

PLR to two top-selling programs

I decided to go with Web writing programs for this first PLR offering. Everyone needs to write for the Web these days, so anyone who buys the PLR will be able to create their own ebooks and other materials from it.

If you’re not sure what “PLR” might be, basically you sell someone the rights to use the material as their own, and create their own materials from it. A buyer can create ebooks, books, courses, blog posts — pretty much anything they like, with some limitations.

Over the years, I’ve used PLR that I’ve bought to to use in my own programs. It cuts down on the time that program creation takes. Of course, buying QUALITY PLR is the key. A lot of the material which is sold as PLR just isn’t of high quality, and you can’t make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear, to use the cliche.

The first PLR offering closes on September 26. I’m not promoting the offering at all, so I doubt that many will be sold. This is a good thing for the PLR buyers; it means that few others will have the material.

Next, I need to write the student memos for last night’s coaching calls. I upload the MP3 recordings too. Whenever I do a phone consultation, I offer to record the session for the client. Most clients want the recording, because it’s a challenge to take in and remember a lot of information in a call.

I’ll be out for lunch and most of the afternoon. When I get back, I’ll need to focus on blogging.

Back again to do the editorial calendars for clients’ blogs and my own

Sunday’s always my big planning day. I spend a couple of hours researching, and writing draft posts for blogs. Two clients have sent images, so I need to tidy them up in Photoshop, to get them ready to post.

I’m pleased that the same clients have decided to try Pinterest. I’m a huge Pinterest fan; it can drive as much traffic as Google, and more, on some sites. The big question of course, is conversions. Pinterest can’t be your entire promotional strategy, but if you sell products or services, it can be a useful part of your overall marketing strategy.

With that done, I review the week, to see what worked, and what didn’t. I write up a couple of memos for clients, review my word count, and I’m done for the day.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Productivity Tools: a Bullet Journal Makes You Smarter

Productivity Tools: a Bullet Journal Makes You Smarter

If you want to be productive, you need good productivity tools. Not only can the right tools save you time, they can make you smarter as well. I’ve always been interested in productivity software; I used to review software for computer magazines, back in the day.

Hands down, my favorite productivity app of all time is the dear departed Lotus Agenda. Agenda fans have been looking for a replacement for 20 years. The program had a steep learning curve. But once you’d figured it out, with the help of a couple of thick manuals, Agenda did what no other software has done as well: it made you smarter. You shoveled information in, and it showed you what you need to know when you needed to know it, as well as making connections between bits of information for you.

I think I’ve found my own replacement for Agenda, and it’s not an app. It’a a bullet journal.

I’ve written about my bullet journal here, and here. I won’t cover the same ground. Watch the brief video on the bullet journal website, and try it for yourself.

You might find as I do, that it fills a gap in your time management and productivity efforts. Or it may not be to your taste all all. However, as the days go by I’m more and more impressed by how elegantly simple a bullet journal is.

Bullet Journaling: Am I Going Totally Analogue?

A reader asked this, and my answer is: NO, of course not. I have so much material in Evernote, OmniFocus and Things that that could never happen. Evernote is my general business Inbox. I use OmniFocus for client stuff, and Things for everything related to my writing students and ebooks/ books/ programs. I need the repeating tasks in those apps, otherwise I’d never keep track.

I’ve always used paper journals; my bullet journal is an enhancement to my collection of productivity tools and time management apps.

My bullet journal helps me to see what I need to do NOW, today, and what I need to do over the next few weeks. I don’t duplicate tasks and appointments I’ve entered into apps at all, there would no point. The bullet journal emphasizes what I MUST focus on throughout the day, and collects sudden rushes of blood to the head. :-)

Here’s how this works in practice. It’s mid-morning on a Sunday. I’ve worked through everything scheduled for the day in OmniFocus; I have four tasks left in Things; and I have four tasks and several notes in my Leuchtturm bullet journal. One of the bullet journal tasks I decided against doing after I’d entered it, so that has a line drawn through it.

I’m not looking to replace my apps with the bullet journal. It’s an added safeguard so that I won’t miss anything. The Collections are brilliant. I’m a big list maker, and most of my lists are in Evernote. I tend just to scan them, then delete them. Writing a list by hand helps me to remember, so I’ll be keeping my lists in the bullet journal going forward.

The bottom line: for whatever reason, the bullet journal helps me to feel in control. It’s easy, it’s fast, and it’s fun. What’s not to like? The “fun” comes from my obsession with fancy fountain pens and inks. :-)

I get the same feeling of comfort and security from my bullet journal that I once got from Lotus Agenda, and haven’t been able to find from any app since. I feel more in control of my schedule, and I even imagine that it’s making me smarter. Who knows, maybe it will. :-)

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Writing Journal 39: Copywriting Workshops

Writing Journal 39: Copywriting Workshops

My writing journal for Saturday, September 20, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

Back to normal this morning; I start off the writing day with the novella. I manage two scenes: 2,500 words.

Next week, I’ll begin a new ghostwriting project: a book proposal for a memoir. I’ve already done several interviews with the client, so I have lots of material. In preparation for starting on the memoir, I spend a couple of timer sessions reading through what I have, and developing cluster diagrams.

Time for Honey’s breakfast. Her arthritis is still bothering her, but she’s enjoying the warmer weather.

I eat my toast while reading email, which is light this morning. I need to get to the backlog of student emails, but I can’t see myself getting to it until tomorrow. It’s Saturday, so it’s a short writing day, and I can’t do it tonight, because I have a couple of student coaching calls.

I’m still loving the bullet journaling process BTW. I love the way you can just dump everything into it, and that you can see what you did, what you didn’t do, what you need to remember, and what you changed your mind about.

There’s lots of info on bullet journaling on the Web; I’ll need to do a blog post about them.

Next, blogging.

But before that, I need to mention that October’s copywriting workshop is fully booked. A couple of people missed out, so my apologies. We haven’t promoted it at all, so I was surprised that it filled so quickly. However, you can book for November.

Leap into Copywriting: October workshop is full

Our October copywriting workshop, which starts on September 29, is full. The next copywriting workshop starts on November 3. It will be the final copywriting workshop for the year.

I haven’t settled the dates yet for the NaNoWriMo workshop. I’ll need to get moving on that.

Blogging and SEO: write content to meet your goals

A blog coaching client asked me about blogging and SEO. In a nutshell: write content to meet your goals, and help your audience, add the appropriate meta data, and promote it as much as you can. Do link outreach. Integrate content with your marketing, and your website. Strive to do more with the content you have.

Next, I do some work on the company history; just 1,200 words, but that’s OK.

Time for lunch, then my Saturday commitments. I hope I get back in time to do a little work before I need to prepare for the coaching calls.

Student coaching

I’m back, just in time to prepare for the coaching calls.

The calls are fun for me, as always. I still need to send the students a quick memo on the plans I developed for them, plus their MP3 recordings. I’ll do that tomorrow.

I’ve been so busy, I haven’t had a chance to do more with the Christmas short stories, so I create a quick outline and cluster for another story.

And that’s it for the day. My review is done, word counts are done. Another writing day is done.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Writing Journal 38: More On Bullet Journal

Writing Journal 38: More On Bullet Journal

My writing journal for Friday, September 19, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

A complicated morning. I managed to complete the nonfiction book edits; that’s now ready to go off to the client. I need to complete the rush copywriting job; that will take a while. I make a good start on it.

Time for Honey’s breakfast, and my own. I read email while I eat my toast, and have a couple of extra-strong coffees. All the student feedback will need to wait until tomorrow. I have a meeting late this afternoon. It will take several hours, so I won’t be able to write tonight. Julia can handle the general email enquiries.

A quick walk, and then it’s back to copywriting. I’ve promised the client that he’ll get it today, and he will. :-)

iOS 8 seems to have downloaded itself to my devices, so there’s short diversion while I get them updated. I’ve been so busy the past week that I haven’t had a chance to check what’s new in this iOS. I’ve heard that you can now copy straight into Evernote, which is good.

Love the bullet journal system

As you may know, I procrastinate, if I allow it. After just a day of using the bullet journal system, I’ve managed to complete two tasks which have been hanging fire for a couple of weeks. There’s something about seeing something written on paper which inspires a “must do this NOW” feeling. No idea why that is, but it’s working for me.

Ryder Carroll, the creator of bullet journal, is currently running a Kickstarter campaign. The campaign was fully funded within eight hours. And yes, I’m a backer. Not only do I like the bullet journal, I’m also a big fan of Leuchtturm1917. So Ryan’s new “unlimited” funding tier appealed to me.

More writing on the copywriting project. It’s moving right along, so I’ll get it done after lunch.

Ghostwriting: the company history

I manage 2,200 words on that; I’ll need to do more over the weekend. Julia’s scheduled more chats with the client for next week. Let’s hope we can keep up the momentum. That’s always a challenge when you’re ghostwriting — you need the information to keep flowing, so you can keep writing.

And it’s time for lunch. Today, we’re having our usual Friday lunch out. Hummingbird cake, here I come. :-)

Back again, and on with the client’s copywriting project. Finally, it’s done. Julia will proof it, and send it off to the client.

Back to the novella

I feel odd writing fiction in the afternoon. To me, it’s an early-morning activity. I get into it, and a manage 1,800 words, which is good. I need to outline the next couple of scenes, so that I can start work on them tomorrow morning.

That’s it for today. I’ve done my daily review, and totted up my word counts. A meeting tonight, and the week is done too.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Writing Journal 37: Bullet Journaling

Writing Journal 37: Bullet Journaling

My writing journal for Thursday, September 18, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

No fiction this morning, because I need to get the client’s rush copywriting job done by tomorrow. (The one to promote the inventory of new products.) I worked on the nonfiction book edits late last night , because I need to get those done by tomorrow too. Therefore, I spent the first three hours of my day focusing on those two projects. This week has zoomed by so quickly.

Oooh… the embarrassment…

Last night, while rearranging my schedule for the next couple of weeks, I discovered that I’d allowed a small copywriting project to slip through the cracks. Highly embarrassing, and guilt-inducing, because this client has been with me for years.

How could this happen? I use OmniFocus, Things, Evernote, and my handwritten journals. After I stopped slapping myself upside the head, I decided to implement a bullet journaling process. Not only because of the missed project, but also because I forget to add ideas, insights and inspirations from my daily handwritten journal to OmniFocus et al — I tell myself I’ll do it “later”, and later never arrives.

More on bullet journaling later today.

Breakfast for Honey, and breakfast for me, while I scan the day’s email. I deal with the responses which will take just a few minutes. (The two minute rule makes sense.) I leave the rest for Julia to schedule.

Then I deal with the missed copywriting project; I make a good start on it, and will have it done by close of business today. Before I start, I call the client and leave a sincere apology on his machine. I feel horrible over this. It should never have happened.

Next, a super-quick walk.

Copywriting marketing materials, and blogging

I need to get this rush job with the product inventory done tomorrow, so I spend the rest of the morning on that.

Phone calls, and lunch at my computer, while scanning social media, and checking over my draft blog posts.

Next, blogging for clients

I love blogging, but it’s relentless. No matter what else is happening, you need to keep up with your blog posts. I complete four posts, and create drafts for several more. I also add content for other posts which will be published this week. I schedule three posts.

Then it’s back to the copywriting project I missed. I leave it for Julia to proof and send to the client. I draft a quick note from me, apologizing again. Thank heavens that’s done.

Bullet journaling: write, see, remember

As I said yesterday, I keep several handwritten journals, because they help my productivity, by keeping me focused on the tasks at hand.

Journaling averts inertia. Inertia is always a big danger for writers. You’re battling inertia every time you begin a project. You battle it during projects too… You daydream and muse, instead of writing. Yes, thinking is important. However, general “thinking” tends to drift off into floating clouds of fantasy, and before you know it, you’re mulling over your next vacation, or wondering what happened to your red-headed best friend from second grade.

It’s no wonder that writers procrastinate. I used to be the queen of procrastination, and it’s an on-going battle to keep it under control. Journaling helps.

I investigated bullet journaling a few months back. A couple of writers I trust are keen on it. However, I didn’t see the need at the time. Now I do, because there’s a big problem with digital scheduling. Yes, it’s effective. However, it’s also possible to back-burner tasks endlessly, and there’s no real day by day archive of what you’ve done, and why you did it.

I’m not calling out any product, but have you seen the archive in OmniFocus, for example? Totally useless. Everything’s jumbled in together. I should say that I’ve used OmniFocus for years — even before it was OmniFocus, and will continue to use it. OmnifFocus started out as Ethan Schoonover’s Kinkless GTD — which was amazing for its time.

So, I decided to implement my own bullet journal. It’s easy to set up in just a few minutes — watch the video here, and you’ve got the gist. Once I’d set it up — in the Leuchtturm1917/ Whitelines medium hardcover notebook I received the other day — I immediately entered the starred items from my handwritten journal. I star items I want to transfer elsewhere, but I rarely get around to doing it.

Of course, it’s MUCH too early to judge how my new system will turn out. I do feel more in control, however. And in the course of setting up the Leuchtturm1917, I remembered several tasks I’d forgotten to enter anywhere else. Yes, writing by hand is slower, but it helps your memory. I’ve created a couple of Collections too, and have added them to the index so that I can find them again.

Fiction, at the wrong time of the day

I returned some phone calls, then opened Scrivener to get back to the novella. I thought that I’d just write a few hundred words, so I wouldn’t lose the thread of the project, but I managed just over 1,000 words, which is excellent, considering how distracted I’ve been.

Finally, my daily review — of my bullet journal and others :-) — and the day’s done. I’ll spend some time on the company history tonight, and the ebook I’m writing for a client. You end up having to scramble to catch up when things slip through the cracks. :-)

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Writing Journal 36: Journals and Story Journals

Writing Journal 36: Journals and Story Journals

My writing journal for Wednesday, September 17, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

Another slow start this morning. Late yesterday a copywriting client called and asked for a rush job. He needs some marketing materials by the end of his week. He’s bought out another company’s inventory. The new stock is a change of direction for him.

So before I could get on with the novella, and the nonfiction book edit, I needed to rearrange some of this week’s projects to make room for this new copywriting project. Unfortunately, there’s not a lot of wiggle room, which means that I’ll be working late.

With that done, it’s onward with the novella. Yesterday’s brainstorming means that I’ve got a firm grasp of the story and the characters, so things should go more smoothly. They do; I manage 2,700 words.

A couple of readers have asked me about journals.

Journals and story journals

I have two kinds of journals, this journal, which is an expurgated version of my daily journal (a work diary, if you like), and project journals.

Journals are invaluable because they keep you writing. I handwrite my daily journal, three times a day. Always before I start writing, then after lunch (sometimes before lunch) and again after the writing day is done.

People keep journals for many different reasons. My reasons:

  • My journals clear my mind; they keep me focused on my writing tasks;
  • They help me to both capture and work out ideas;
  • They get any emotional stuff out of the way so I can focus on words.

Focus is especially vital when you’re writing fiction; a novel, or as I’m writing currently, a series of novellas.

Over the years, I’ve ditched several novels because I lost their emotional thread. Anytime you take time off from fiction, you take a risk that you’ll lose your inspiration.

Keeping a story journal helps: you can talk to yourself on the page. Mystery author Sue Grafton often talks about her book journals.

Journaling is a form of pre-writing, and it helps my productivity. Whenever I get “too busy” to journal, I end up writing less.

I don’t have time for the nonfiction ebook edits this morning; I’ve slated them for tonight.

Time for Honey’s breakfast. Then I eat my own, while dealing with email.

Next, some phone calls, and then onward with the company history. I manage to write 2,400 words; it’s going well.

I’m tempted to eat at my computer, but that would be stupid. I didn’t go for a walk this morning, and I need a break. It’s a lovely day, so I go for a quick walk, then come back and have lunch.

The two presentations are almost done. It takes another two timer sessions, then they’re ready for Julia to check.

More email and phone calls, and then it’s back to the company history book, so that I can read over what I have, and make some notes for tomorrow.

Research for the rush copywriting job

I called the client, to get some phone numbers. I need to do a couple of quick research interviews. I manage to catch both people in their office, with time to chat. That’s wonderful; it means that I can get most of the material I need.

My Livescribe Echo is perfect for these kinds of interviews, because I don’t need to record the entire conversation, just important parts.

The time slips away. Before know it, the day’s done. I do my daily review, and total my word counts. I’ll need to work on the nonfiction book edits later tonight.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Slideshare Trick: Your Deck As a Gif

Kindle Fiction: Write Hot-Selling Short Stories

If you use Slideshare, you may like this clever trick: Gifdeck turns your decks into gifs. Just go to Slideshare and get the URL for your deck, and paste it into Gifdeck. Within a few seconds, it’s created a gif for you.

You can add the gif anywhere you’d like — into a blog post, or into Twitter, or even into an email message.

It’s an easy way to get more mileage out of your presentations.

Oh — here’s the real presentation. The gif is too fast to read. However, it does get attention. It’s a way of pepping up your social media content very simply.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Writing Journal 35: Harvesting Inspiration

Writing Journal 35: Harvesting Inspiration

My writing journal for Tuesday, September 16, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

A slow start this morning. I spent most of my novella-writing time developing a HUGE cluster diagram of character and plot ideas.

Although this is good, I wanted to get on with the writing. I’ve learned to go with the flow, so if this is what my inner writer feels is necessary, more power to the muse.

You’ve got to harvest your inspirations when you can. I used the Inspiration app (the name suits the app perfectly) to develop the cluster, because you can just keep going. It’s got an endless canvas, so your diagrams can be as large as you like.

I’ve used Inspiration for years, going way back to the time I was a Windows person. I made the switch to Macs in 2005, so I’ve been using it for well over a decade. Wonderful app. It’s got an iPad version, but I haven’t tried that yet.

Consequently, with all the brainstorming, I managed just 300 words of the novella.

It must just be a morning for my muse to go overboard. As soon as I started editing the nonfiction book for my ghostwriting client; I got an idea for a new writers’ program. Sigh — as if I need anything more on my plate. I clustered on that for a while, then got myself back into editing.

Honey was restless, so I gave her her breakfast and made my own, while scanning social media. Although I know I should avoid it, I read more about the Hachette/ Amazon dispute.

Email was heavy this morning, with lots of student material. I’ve scheduled handling that for tonight, because I won’t have time during the day.

The weather’s warming up. We’ve got rain and thunderstorms this morning, so walking is out. If the weather clears, I need to go for a walk this afternoon.

Interview for the company history

Julia managed to schedule some interviews for the company history, which is great. Wonderful client, very easy to work with. I made some notes, and we chatted for 40 minutes. I wrote up my notes, and spent a couple of hours working on the project.

Then, lunch at my computer, while reading news websites. I tend to be a news junkie, although I’m trying to wean myself away from it.

Presentations: thank you, Haiku Deck

I’ve got two presentations to do for my retainer client. Julia scheduled an interview, so we have a little chat. It only takes 20 minutes to get the information I need.

The presentations are already outlined, so I brainstorm a couple of taglines, and spend a couple of timer sessions working on them.

Thanks to Haiku Deck, presentations take much less time than they used to. I create a draft presentation in Haiku Deck, then export it to PowerPoint.

I got an idea for the company history, so I went back to work on it. I started out just making notes, but I ended up writing 1,500 words.

Whitelines Magic: Two new Leuchtturm1917/ Whitelines notebooks

Leuchtturm1917 medium and the Leuchtturm1917 pocket hard covers

Happy days. I’m a huge fan of Whitelines paper. I ordered two new notebooks, and they arrived today — they’re Link notebooks, so I can scan pages directly into Evernote.

When I bought several Whitelines notebooks last year, their Whitelines Link notebooks weren’t available in Australia. I thought about ordering them from Sweden, then gave myself a slap in the head, because I couldn’t justify that.

Time rolls on. I used the notebooks and now Whitelines Link notebooks are available in Australia — thank you larryPost.

My notebooks arrived this morning. I ordered the Leuchtturm1917 medium and the Leuchtturm1917 pocket hard covers. I LOVE Leuchtturm1917, because the pages are numbered, there’s a table of contents, AND they have nifty pockets in the back.

Both Leuchtturm1917 and Whitelines paper is very fountain pen friendly. Currently my favorite “everything” pen is a medium steel nib Waterman, with J.Herbin Larmes de Cassis ink.

Larmes de Cassis is a dusty rose color, but it’s very readable on Whitelines, and scanned into Evernote. It’s also a very restful ink. I bought it last year, and hated it at first, but it’s grown on me. I use it for almost everything now.

I use paper all day, every day, and either recycle it, or scan it into Evernote. As soon as I unpacked the notebooks, I downloaded the Whitelines Link app to my phone. The app will scan my notes directly into Evernote. Yes! I’m a very happy person. :-)

Rolling along with the nonfiction book freebie

I manage to do another 1,500 words on it. It’s going very well. I just need to source some graphics for it.

Client proposals

I send out client proposals frequently, but over the past few weeks I’ve been too busy trying to get everything done. We’re culling many of our writing programs, which means that there’s been a huge amount of student material to go through. So, I’ve been slacking off on proposals, time to get moving on the backlog.

A few phone calls, my daily review and word count totals, and the day is done.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.