Writing Journal 27: Use Scrivener for Everything

Writing Journal 27: Use Scrivener for Everything

My writing journal for Monday, September 8, 2014. You can find all the writing journal entries here.

I woke up this morning with an idea for Christmas short story. So instead of working on the novella I’m ghostwriting for a client, I decided to write the story instead. I managed 1800 words of the story; very satisfying. I’ll work on the novella later today, or perhaps tonight.

Then on to the client’s nonfiction book. I did a rough edit of several chapters, and compiled them to PDF, so that I could send them to him. Scrivener makes it easy to send out as little or as much as you like of any project.

A couple of students have asked me about ghostwriting with Scrivener, so let’s chat about that.

Scrivener for freelance writers, coaches, and consultants

Although I primarily use Scrivener for long projects, you can use Scrivener for short projects too. For example, I use Scrivener for my retainer clients — clients for whom I write regularly.

I don’t use Scrivener for blogging, even though many writers do. Thaddeus Hunt has a complete blogging system, and so does Jennifer Mattern.

Scrivener’s wonderful for medium to long projects, because you can develop many novels within one Scrivener file. The five novellas I’m ghostwriting for a client are all in one file. This makes it very easy to compile one ebook, or few chapters and send them to a client. You can also keep your front matter and back matter within the file, duplicating them and customizing them for each ebook.

Monica McCarty uses a Scrivener file to manage her series’ Bible. Visit the Scrivener forum, to see the many ways in which people use Scrivener.

On to email, which is light, just some student material for review. I zoom through that, and it’s time for Honey’s breakfast. I review my Christmas short story as I eat my toast. I can’t resist writing another few hundred words. That takes the story to 2,500 words.

A client presentation…

It’s time to develop a pitch presentation for a client. I start by researching his marketing materials, and creating an outline. He’ll be delivering the presentation, I just need to create it. I do some thinking, and brainstorming, and then put it aside for tomorrow, to let it gestate.

No time to walk today; I have a meeting this afternoon, and need to run some errands after that.

I create some notes for Julia. She needs to chase up the subject matter experts so that I can complete a draft of a client’s website content for his product launch. I didn’t think it would happen on Friday, but it needs to happen today or tomorrow.

I spend a couple of timer sessions developing questions for the SMEs.

Next, I check on my draft blog posts, and add some material to several. I’ll schedule them for publication once I complete them. Usually, I’ll schedule posts for publication several days ahead. (This is a reason I don’t use Scrivener for blogging; I’m in and out of the WordPress blog editor several times a day.)

And it’s time to go…

Back late

I’m glad I got so much done this morning. I got back to the office very late. Time to catch up on emails, and phone calls. Then my daily review, total up my word counts, and the work day is done.

With luck, I’ll write a couple of thousand words of the novella tonight. :-)

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, and on YouTube, too.

Author: Angela Booth

Copywriter Angela Booth's clients tell her she performs "word magic." Whether she's writing advertising materials, Web content, or ghostwriting for her clients, she's committed to helping them to achieve results, fast. Author of one of the first books about online business, Making The Internet Work For Your Business, Angela's written many business books which have been published by major publishers. She's an enthusiastic self-publisher and writing teacher.